Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

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Posts Tagged ‘flugelhorn’

Trumpet Show, “I Stand for the Flag,” at Ida Culver House Broadview in North Seattle

Posted by glennled on June 9, 2019

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Entrance, Ida Culver House, Broadview in North Seattle

 

On 21 May, I gave my first performance of my trumpet show, “I Stand for the Flag,” a collection of 25 patriotic marches, songs, a bugle call, and a hymn. The venue was Ida Culver House, Broadview, a retirement community in north Seattle. For one hour, I entertained the residents with pieces such as “Semper Fidelis,” “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again,” “Over There,” “Shenandoah,” “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” (The Navy Hymn), “God Bless America,” “America the Beautiful,” and “You’re a Grand Old Flag.”

The residents sang along and, in between songs, laughed (or groaned) at my jokes. I introduced each song with a wee bit of information about it, such as when it was written by whom or with what branch of the service it is associated or what famous singers made recordings of it, etc.

Dressed in my VFW uniform, I used four Bb instruments: my Getzen trumpet, Super Olds cornet, Getzen bugle, and Jupiter pocket trumpet.

On the bugle, I sounded my favorite call, “Tattoo,” which nightly is played 15 minutes before “Taps,” which signals lights out at 10 p.m. For the mournful “Shenandoah,” I played my cornet with a Denis Wick 4 mouthpiece which makes it sound like a flugelhorn. For “The Navy Hymn,” I used my regular Bach 8C cornet mouthpiece. My Jupiter pocket trumpet was my choice for playing “You’re a Grand Old Flag.” And for the marches and most other pieces, I used my Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet (please see my blog post of 14 December 2015), with either a Bach 8C or Bach 1.5C mouthpiece. For me, the 8C plays easier in the high range, and the 1.5C does better in the low range.

Ida Culver House, Broadview (ICHB)

This retirement community is part of the Era Living family of 8 such communities in the Greater Seattle area (please see https://www.eraliving.com/communities/broadview/). ICHB offers facilities and services for independent, assisted living, skilled nursing, short-term rehabilitation, and memory care. Stephanie Butler, Life Enrichment Coordinator, offered me this opportunity to entertain the ICHB residents.

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Private cottage residences

ICHB has 245 residences with floor plans ranging from studios and three-bedroom apartments to single family cottages with garages! From some vantage points, there are breathtaking views of Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains. Residents enjoy a lavishly landscaped garden courtyard, refreshing saltwater pool, elegant décor, and fine dining.

Amenities include:

  • Vibrant Life Enrichment programs
  • Café Bistro and billiards
  • Elegant restaurant with an in-house chef
  • On-site Wellness Center staffed by a nurse and caregivers
  • Emergency call and daily check-in system
  • Weekly housekeeping and linen services
  • Maintenance services
  • Personal* and group transportation
  • Access to public transit
  • EnhanceFitness classes
  • Swimming pool & spa
  • Beautiful outdoor amenities, lush garden, and terrace seating
  • Full-service, on-site beauty salon and massage therapy studio*
  • Library and Media Room
  • Fireside lounge
  • Professionally curated art collections
  • Resident garage* & street level parking available

* Additional fee

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Fitness class

Residence Features include:

  • Full kitchens
  • Cable TV and internet access
  • All utilities except telephone
  • Easy-access shower
  • Bath tubs in select residences
  • Individually controlled heating
  • Washer & dryer in select apartments
  • Private decks or patios in select residences
  • Emergency call system
  • Additional storage available
  • Pet-friendly

Sample Floor Plans and Starting Monthly Fees: please see https://www.eraliving.com/communities/broadview/floor-plans/.

Photos are courtesy of Ida Culver House, Broadview. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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“Things Remembered” Trumpet Show for Aegis of Lynnwood Retirement Community

Posted by glennled on December 29, 2018

Happy Hour 1 (6) - by Brenda, 12-14-'18

For my final trumpet show in 2018, I performed “Things Remembered” at the Aegis of Lynnwood Retirement Community on 14 December for an audience of about 25. In the past year, I’ve presented either this 1-hour show or another, “Showtune Favorites,” at 8 different retirement communities in Lynnwood, Bothell, Redmond, and Mercer Island. I want to do more in 2019—it’s wholesome and fun! And I have prepared a third, entirely new show, “In Retrospect,” for return appearances at retirement communities where I’ve already performed.

“Things Remembered” is my Christmas show. It consists of a dozen Christmas songs, mixed with a dozen hit songs from musicals and movies that are well-known favorites among the residents of all retirement communities—songs like “Over the Rainbow” from The Wizard of Oz,” (1939), sung by Judy Garland, and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” from Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), also sung by Judy Garland. The residents sing-along and chuckle at a few of my jokes, too.

I play one cornet and two trumpets, sometimes with a Harmon mute, and use four mouthpieces. One mouthpiece, the Wick 4, makes the cornet sound like a flugelhorn, so in effect, I play four horns during the show.

Aegis of Lynnwood

Aegis operates 31 facilities in Washington (16), California (14), and Nevada (1), according to the website, http://www.aegisliving.com. In Washington, all 16 retirement communities are in the Greater Seattle area. Six more new ones are planned to open through 2021. Aegis Living ranks in the coveted list of Top 50 Best Places to Work in America in 2017, amid 600,000 companies on the employee review site, http://www.Glassdoor.com.

At Aegis of Lynnwood, where I presented my trumpet show, residents are provided the following services: memory care, assisted living, and short-term care. Check them out at  https://www.aegisliving.com/aegis-living-of-lynnwood/. And more than that, see their 25-photo gallery: https://www.aegisliving.com/aegis-living-of-lynnwood/gallery. Three different floor plans (650 s.f.) are available. For assisted living, there are both 1-bedroom and 2-bedroom floor plans. The other plan, named “Life’s Neighborhood,” also has two bedrooms. Please find these plans at https://www.aegisliving.com/aegis-living-of-lynnwood/accommodations/.

Photos are courtesy of Aegis of Lynnwood. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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“Things Remembered”—My 1-Hour Trumpet Show on the First Day of Advent at Overlake Terrace Retirement Community in Redmond

Posted by glennled on December 23, 2018

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My Christmas trumpet show is called “Things Remembered” because, by using some old favorite songs, I walk the audience through the common pattern of life that we all share—living single, falling in love, getting married, raising a family, celebrating Christmas year after year, laughing at jokes, overcoming adversity, facing retirement, and celebrating the fantastic blessings of life in America during our wonderful time in human history. On 1 December, the first day of Advent this year, I performed this show for an audience of 25-30 residents and staff at Overlake Terrace Retirement Community in Redmond.2017-assisted-living-award-sm

20181201_132322The show consists of 24 songs, half from musicals and movies and half about Christmas. All are favorites of the age group living today in retirement communities. They sing along as I play. And as they listen to me play and talk, they recall where they were and what was happening when they first heard and learned those songs—“Things Remembered.”

2018-assisted-living-awardFor variety and fun, as appropriate for each song, I play three instruments (two trumpets and one cornet) and use four mouthpieces and one mute. One mouthpiece makes my Super Olds cornet sound like a flugelhorn, so in effect, it’s like playing four different instruments for them.

Overlake Terrace provides independent, assisted living, memory care, and respite services. For more information, here is the link to the website:  https://www.stellarliving.com/overlake-terrace/. And for a tour of the interior of the facilities, please see the photo gallery here: https://www.stellarliving.com/overlake-terrace/photo-tour/. The 14 photos show the main lobby entrance, café, and dining room; model bedroom and living room; family rooms, library, exercise room, activity room, and movie theater.

Overlake Terrace is part of Stellar Senior Living, based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The group consists of 8 retirement communities, including two in Washington (Redmond and Kent), two in Utah, two in Idaho, and one each in Colorado and Arizona.

The photos below are courtesy of Overlake Terrace. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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My “Things Remembered” Show at SHAG Retirement Community in Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on December 20, 2017

 

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Glenn Ledbetter (background) plays trumpet and cornet in his one-hour show, “Things Remembered,” for SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center Senior Living residents

 

Last Saturday afternoon, 15 December 2017, about 45 people in a retirement community whom I’d never met came to hear me play trumpet. I had promised to perform a one-hour show for them, playing a mixture of 25 songs—12 Christmas songs and 13 songs from classic musicals and movies. I entitled my show “Things Remembered.”

I chose songs to induce them to remember different times and stages in their own lives. Here are some examples. One of the most beautiful songs ever written, “Over the Rainbow,” expresses our universal hopes and dreams about finding happiness and IMG_4631success, and “I’ve Got the World on a String” expresses our achievements of the same. But then, “Stormy Weather” expresses our feelings of failure and depression, while “Make Someone Happy” answers the question of how to make those Over-the-Rainbow dreams come true—love. For caring for babies, those helpless, totally dependent creatures we conceived, “Summertime” says it best.

The Christmas songs I played were to entice us to remember being a kid and later, having kids and grandkids. They tell us of the birth of our Savior. They renew our spirit, they spark new hopes and plans and joy and peace. My elderly audience sang the words from memory.

IMG_4641For thinking about retirement, I chose “When I’m Sixty-Four.” For feeling gratitude, I played “God Bless America.” For summing up our lives, I played the lovely, precious “What a Wonderful World,” and then finished with this earnest farewell, “Have Yourself a Very Merry Christmas.”

Amongst the songs, I worked in a dozen jokes that I have shared this year with my 12-year old granddaughter, who last Christmas gave me a whole book of jokes. And I offered a handout to the audience—a list of 50 jokes and riddles from that same book, so that they could share them with their own grandchildren. All 30 copies disappeared.

I played both my Getzen trumpet (Doc Severinsen model) and Super Olds cornet (63 years old). Sometimes I used a Harmon mute, as in “Santa Baby.” When I use a deep-cup mouthpiece with the cornet, it sounds like a flugelhorn. I tried to make my horns sing the lyrics of those lovely songs. IMG_4599

Their kind gifts totaled $20, which I then donated to VFW Post 1040, Lynnwood, where I am the Post Bugler.

 

SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center Senior Living

Senior Housing Assistance Group (SHAG) is a non-profit organization formed in 1988 and is the largest provider of affordable senior apartment homes in Washington State. SHAG offers some units at market rates with no tenant-income restrictions, and others which are for tenants living on limited incomes. In compliance with state and federal laws, SHAG gladly accepts Section 8d and VASH (Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing) certificates and vouchers.

SHAG  communities serve more than 5,000 active, independent seniors in 25+ locations in the Puget Sound region, from Bellingham to Olympia, including eight locations in Seattle. These locations are near public transit hubs, retail shopping and public services.

All SHAG senior living communities have income and/or age restrictions that residents must meet in order to qualify for an apartment. The Lynnwood City Center Senior Living community serves seniors of all income levels who are 61 or older by the end of the IMG_4649 current year or 55 or older and disabled. The minimum lease term is 6 months, if available, but leases are generally for 12 months. The units are 1- and 2-bedroom size. Certain units have washer/dryer hookups and reserved garage parking. However, you need not own a car to live here. If you qualify, you can join SHAG’s Nissan Leaf Program and drive a so-called “company car.” Many SHAG residents contract with in-home care providers for housekeeping and medical help.

Amenities at Lynnwood City Center include courtyards, a rooftop deck, fully equipped fitness center, social room and TV lounge, craft and game room, business center, pea patch, rooftop dog run, free Wi-Fi in common areas, and social activities. Small pets, such as cats or dogs weighing 25 lbs. or less, are welcome. There is a two-pet maximum per household, and a $100 fee per pet is due at move-in. All pets are subject to approval.

You can reach SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center at www.shaglynnwood.com and 425-201-5284. For SHAG itself, the website is http://www.housing4seniors.com, telephone 1-844-592-SHAG (7424).

Photos are courtesy of SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

 

 

 

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My New Cornet Student Is Only 81!

Posted by glennled on February 18, 2016

1PC-Evolution-font-b-Marching-b-font-Band-font-b-Trumpet-b-font-Player-Fashion-WaterproofUntil now, I’ve never had a trumpet or cornet student who is older than I am! Holy cow, we’re 156 years old! Bob was born in 1934, and is my 26th student. We held his first lesson in his living room on 2 February.

He’s a fan of Joseph W. Marcinkiewicz, author of the instruction book, The Buzzone: The Art of Playing Efficiently and Comfortably. Marcinkiewicz advertises it on his website as “the definitive text for the brasswind player.” Well, blow me down! I had never heard of it. So I bought it. (You never stop learning.)

Bob played cornet all throughout grade school, high school and college but dropped it as he began his career, married, and raised his family. His love of music, especially classical, had convinced him to become a music educator, but he ultimately decided to become an engineer so that he could support his family at the lifestyle level he wanted to. In 1989, 27 years ago, he retired as an engineering manager from U S WEST, a Bell System Operating Company, and now lives with his wife in Snohomish. In retirement, it was time for Bob to do something different. That became travelling in a fifth-wheeler, consulting, listening to music, reading, studying, and today, tutoring mathematics at all levels.

Since college, Bob has been off the horn almost 60 years! Five to 10 years ago, he bought a Bach trumpet and played it for about a year, but its sound was too brilliant for his taste, so he got rid of it. Music gives him “mental stimulation and enjoyment,” he says, and now he wants to become a performer again, not just a listener. (Please see my article, “Hear ‘Your Brain on Music’ by Dr. Larry Sherman,” posted on 2 February 2012.)

Bob’s ambition is to play in a church orchestra by next fall. He has bought a Kanstul cornet, model 1530 (silver) with a 0.470″ bore. Bob’s dream would be someday to play

“Napoli: Variations on a Neapolitan Song,” composed by Herman Bellstedt. The song on which the variations are based is “Funiculi, Funicula” by Luigi Denza in 1880. For a thrill and to appreciate the magnitude of Bob’s dream, copy this link and listen to Ole Edvard Antonsen play it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elo0SPMo6qg. Way to go, Bob—let’s roll!

Never having had private lessons before, Bob realizes that he won’t reach his goals without professional training. He chose me off one of the websites where I advertise myself as a trumpet and cornet tutor. Why cornet (which was very popular in the 19th century), when in the early 20th century, the whole world turned to the trumpet as the “instrument of choice?” Because that’s what he played all through school, and that’s the darker, smoother, mellower sonority that most pleases his ear. Bob remembers that in his school days, he used too much pressure on his mouth. After playing, the mouthpiece’s mark on his lips would stay there for hours. That led him to The Buzzone by Marcinkiewicz. Bob wants to strengthen the muscles in his embouchure so he won’t have to use such heavy pressure to reach the high notes—hard pressure will cut your stamina and endurance and can cause pain or injury.

Zigmant Kanstul launched Kanstul Musical Instruments in 1981. Located in Anaheim, California, one mile east of Disneyland, Kanstul’s 36 craftsmen manufacture a complete line of brass musical instruments. To view Bob’s new cornet, please see http://kanstul.net/detail.php?pass_search=1530.0000&pass_instrument=Cornet.

Marcinkiewicz Co., Inc. makes hand-crafted trumpets, cornets, flugelhorns, trombones, and several unique horns such as pocket and piccolo trumpets, as well as mouthpieces for them all. The factory is in Canby, Oregon. See http://www.marcinkiewicz.com.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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McGinn’s Farewell Elementary School Bands Concert

Posted by glennled on September 19, 2015

After 15 successful years as Director of Instrumental Music at Skyview Jr. High School in Bothell, Mr. Shawn McGinn is leaving for California in the coming months.

Music-clipart4-1024x835He conducted his final elementary school bands concert on 27 May at the Northshore Performing Arts Center (NPAC) at Bothell High School. The two bands (1st year and 2nd year) are comprised of students from nearby Crystal Springs, Canyon Creek, and Fernwood elementary schools.

The 1st year band played Bang the Drum All Day (I Don’t Want to Work) by Todd Rundgren, arranged by Michael Story.

As guest conductor, I then led the 2nd year band in playing Andromeda Overture by Mark Williams.

Finally, both bands joined in playing William Tell Overture by Gioacchino Rossini, arranged by Andrew Balent.

The concert concluded with a jazz trio jam session featuring piano, tenor sax, and flugelhorn, played by Mr. McGinn.

 

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Magnolia Man (39) Takes Trumpet on Journey toward Jazz Quintet

Posted by glennled on December 17, 2010

What motivates a man to pick up the trumpet at 39 years old and start to play? In the case of my 14th student, it’s his love of jazz and specifically, his love and appreciation of  the music played by one of the greats, Miles Davis. My student owns and works out of his 2.5-story home in Magnolia in Seattle, and we practice there weekly in his warm, spacious basement. In “X” years, he’d like to be playing locally in a small band, perhaps a quintet. But for now, like any 5th-grade beginner, the Magnolia Man must first learn the basics, the fundamentals. We started lessons on 9 December.

“Everyone who got where he is had to begin where he was,” wrote Robert Louis Stevenson, author of Treasure Island, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and many other books. And so it was with Miles Davis, too. Miles, the son of a dentist in East St. Louis, got his first trumpet at age 13. He was a prodigy—it was his horn. At 18, he went to New York City. During 1957-1963, he collaborated with Gil Evans, often playing both flugelhorn and trumpet. That’s when I first became acquainted with his music, including the albums ‘Round About Midnight, Miles Ahead, and Porgy and Bess, and this remains my favorite period of his music. To my young ears, it was stunningly beautiful.

Miles was an innovator. He experimented with and led several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion. After he died in 1991, eight digitally-enhanced box sets of his recordings have been released. The 6-CD set, Miles Davis and Gil Evans: The Complete Columbia Studio Recordings, won three Grammy Awards: Best Historical Album, Best Album Notes, and Best Recording Package (Boxed). This was only the third time in Grammy history that that trifecta was ever achieved.

In 1959, his magnum opus, Kind of Blue, was released. And 49 years later (2008), the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) issued its fourth platinum certification for this album, signifying sales of four million copies. In 2006, Miles Davis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He is considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century.

I saw and heard him play only once. When I came back from Vietnam, there was a jazz place down in Pioneer Square, and one night I went there by myself to hear him play. Before going, I had read in a magazine article that he had the reputation of being cold, withdrawn, and distant. They said he would sometimes play with his back to the audience. He did, and I left, having drunk too many “stingers on the rocks” and feeling very alone.

For more about the life and work of Miles Davis, see http://www.milesdavis.com and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles Davis.

I’ve found that my older students tend to identify with special trumpeters. With the Magnolia Man, it’s Miles Davis. With the downtown Seattle 50-year old, it’s Herb Alpert. When asked what trumpeters he admires, my Bothell 9th grader replied, “Dizzie Gillespie.” I should ask the Magnolia Man which of Miles’ periods, albums, and CDs he likes best. I’ll do that.

“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step,” says a Chinese proverb. Three cheers for the Magnolia Man! He’s on the path.

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