Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

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Posts Tagged ‘trumpet’

Six Bugle Calls at Memorial Day, D-Day, Flag Day, and Independence Day Ceremonies at Shoreline Veterans Recognition Plaza

Posted by glennled on July 29, 2020

Veterans Recognition Plaza, Shoreline, WA
On Flag Day, Dwight N. Stevens, WWII veteran, was honored with a wreath as his son, Larry Stevens, holds his hand over his heart. “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” was played, the Honor Guard (background) fired three volleys, and “Taps” was sounded. Photo by Denise Frisino.

During a recent six-week span, Shoreline City Hall was the scene of four major military ceremonies held outdoors at the adjacent Veterans Recognition Plaza which was dedicated on 21 May 2016. The ceremonies were organized and led by a Shoreline resident, Major General Ray Coffey, United States Volunteer Joint Service Command (USVJSC)

  • 25 May – Memorial Day
  • 6 June – D-Day
  • 14 June – Flag Day and 246th birthday of U.S. Army
  • 4 July – Independence Day and 244th birthday of USA

Participating in these ceremonies reminded me that, of course, the Army was formed before the United States became an independent nation. We had to fight a war to win independence. On 14 June 1775, the Continental Congress authorized the enlistment of riflemen to serve the United Colonies for one year. On the next day, George Washington was chosen as Commander-in-Chief and assigned the rank of General.

Major participants in the various ceremonies included members of the USVJSC, U.S. Army Reserve Command, U.S. Army Recruiting Command, VFW Post 3348 (Shoreline), VFW Post 1040 (Lynnwood), American Legion Post 0227 (Shoreline), NW Junior Pipe Band, Boy Scout Troop 312 (Edmonds), and veterans of all five military branches.

When called upon, the Honor Guard of VFW Post 1040 fired the three-volley salutes at these ceremonies. Likewise, when called upon, I sounded up to six bugle calls: Assembly, To the Color, Adjutant’s Call, Flourish for Review (“Ruffles”), Taps, and Echo Taps. On 4 July, a Boy Scout who has earned the Bulger Merit Badge sounded both Echo Taps with me and To the Color (solo). I used my Getzen bugle, and he used his trumpet. He is now an 8-grader at Madrona School in Edmonds and sounds Taps with the VFW Post 1040 Honor Guard at funeral services. Symphony Aimes sang “America the Beautiful” and “God Bless America” at the Independence Day ceremony.

Please click to enlarge a photo.

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

My Trumpet Students #42, #54, and “The Backyard Trio” in South Wedgwood Neighborhood of Seattle

Posted by glennled on July 19, 2020

The Backyard Trio plays “Bourbon Street” by Nick Homes
(L to R: Student No. 54, Glenn Ledbetter, and No. 42)

Last March, Covid-19 restrictions forced me to stop teaching trumpet lessons in my students’ homes, something I’ve been doing since 2009. We switched to online lessons. I now have six students doing this. But on 6 May, as the restrictions eased, I returned to the home of one student at the request of his parents. The mother is a nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center (where my oldest son was born). We held the lesson in their back yard and practiced social distancing! And that led to the later creation of “The Backyard Trio.” Let me explain.

R: Student No. 42

I’ve been teaching their son for the past two years (please use the Archives column on the left to find my blog post about him on 18 May 2018). He was my 42nd trumpet student, and his first goal was to make Jazz Band at Eckstein Middle School in the South Wedgwood neighborhood in Seattle. He made it! Not only that, but, as a 6th grader, he played a solo at the “Jazz Night” concert at Eckstein last year under the direction of Mr. Cuauhtémoc Escobedo (“Mr. E” or “Moc”). Please see my blog post, with photos, of 20 December 2019.

L: Student No. 54

Also playing trumpet at that concert and also pictured in that blog post was one of his best friends, who has recently become my 54th trumpet student. Our online private lessons commenced on 1 July. No. 54 says that when he first had a choice of instruments, he didn’t like the sound of the violin; the clarinet and saxophone required too much air; but the trumpet had a “cool sound and only 3 buttons.” He loves sports, including downhill skiing and mountain biking (two favorites), basketball (wing), baseball, swimming, water polo, and ultimate frisbee. Both he and No. 42 do water polo and ultimate frisbee. Both are multi-talented, and on trumpet, both have natural ability and pick up new things quickly. Next fall, they will be 7th graders, playing in two different jazz bands at Eckstein. They’re preparing for it this summer.

You see, the parents of both boys set this up. The mother of No. 54 found some duets for the boys to play. We all ordered “Jazz Duets (Easy)” for trumpets by Nick Homes online at http://www.jazzduets.com. The e-book contains 8 duets. Then, on Wednesday afternoons, we held a 45-minute Zoom meeting (https://zoom.us), with each of us in our separate homes. But as you know, there is a latency problem when teaching music online. Because of communications delays, you can’t play together simultaneously. So, each person, including me, has to play independently. We were playing duet parts separately and alternately. The lessons were very good but never “whole.”

The Backyard Trio (L to R: Student No. 54, Glenn Ledbetter, and Student No. 42

Then the mother of No. 42 suggested that all three of us meet in their backyard when the weather was nice. We would bring our own music stands, sit far enough apart in our straight-backed chairs, play our duets, and I would teach trumpet jazz. On 6 May, we did it for the first time, and on 15 July, we did it again. That’s how “The Backyard Trio” was born.

Now, we’d like to continue doing it (Covid-19, weather, and schedules permitting) through the remainder of the summer. Meanwhile, I also teach each boy a 30-minute online private lesson every week. We’re starting to move on to other songs now. Last session, I gave them the trumpet sheet music for “Bernie’s Tune” by Bernie Miller and “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” by Randy Newman. Let’s roll, boys. We’re “The Backyard Trio!”

Video and photos by Mom of No. 42.

Posted in Musical Events at Home, New Students - Intro Posts, Rehearsals, Practices | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Two Buddies from Lawton Elementary School in Magnolia, Seattle Are My Nos. 52 and 53 Trumpet Students

Posted by glennled on July 16, 2020

Think about it—last fall, two good friends start 5th grade at Lawton Elementary School in Magnolia, Seattle and decide to join band together. They both have the same first name, and they live only about 10 blocks apart. What instrument(s)? They decide to play trumpet together. And then this spring, they both decide to take trumpet lessons—from me!

One boy (12) rented his horn from Ted Brown Music in the University District (please see https://www.tedbrownmusic.com/t-seattle.aspx). When band started, there were six trumpet players, but they met only once a week. He was not learning to read music, so his parents offered him private lessons. They found me on http://www.LessonsInYourHome.com, and so it was that I came to their home for the first lesson on 27 February 2020, and began teaching my 52nd trumpet student.

One thing led to another. My wife and I went away on vacation in Honolulu in March. When we returned, Covid-19 restrictions had been imposed, and we self-quarantined for two weeks.

My 53rd student (11) said that at the beginning of school last fall, he had a choice of violin, cello, trumpet, trombone, or clarinet. The clarinet was too long and had too many buttons. The violin would be uncomfortable on his shoulders. He says his arms are too short for the trombone. And the trumpet had only three buttons—aha, the winner! So, he, too, went to Ted Brown Music and rented his trumpet.

There were six trumpeters in the boys’ class. The music teacher, Timothy Burk, told them to learn the notes, and even though he and his friend were not doing that so well, they still were ahead of their classmates. When No. 53 learned that No. 54 was taking private lessons, his parents agreed to let him take lessons, also.

And so it began with our first half-hour lesson on 31 March—online—one boy at 2 p.m., the other at 3 p.m. Good players, both.

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Christmas Trumpet Show at Quail Park of Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on February 11, 2020

QPL Exterior View

Quail Park of Lynnwood

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Along driveway to hilltop entrance to Quail Park of Lynnwood

 

Want quiet privacy in the city? Try Quail Park of Lynnwood (QPL), where I played my one-hour Christmas trumpet show, “Things Remembered,” on 15 December 2019. About 25 residents attended; meanwhile, the Seattle Seahawks played the Carolina Panthers, and others watched the game elsewhere on TV. The award-winning QPL is situated on a hill between Highway 99 and I-5, but you’d never know it if you didn’t see the sign pointing up the driveway through the trees. Drive up there into the sunshine at the top. IMG_0626

When I did so, I found that they are building new facilities and enlarging the complex. QPL offers independent living, assisted living, and memory care. There are 85 existing apartments and 45 memory care suites. The expansion will add another 96 apartments, along with 26 luxury cottages. Please see https://www.quailparkoflynnwood.com.

Candace Hartzell, Life Enhancement Director, invited me to play there. My “Things Remembered” show is one of six that I perform. It consists of 25 familiar pieces—14 Christmas songs and 11 others, mostly from popular musicals and movies from the residents’ era. I used my Getzen trumpet (c.1977) and Super Olds cornet (1954), along with two mutes, and my Yamaha Allen Vizzutti mouthpiece.

Veterans Administration Benefits 

I have now played my trumpet shows at 15 different retirement communities from Issaquah to Edmonds, and QPL’s website is the first one I’ve seen that includes information which encourages veterans to use their benefits in order to live there. Here is some of that information:

 

 

Types of Benefits Administered by Veterans Benefits Administration

  • Education benefits
  • Vocational rehabilitation
  • Home loans
  • Health care
  • Life insurance
  • Burial benefits
  • Service-connected compensation and non-service connected pension
  • Survivor’s Benefits (Dependency and Indemnity Compensation, and Death Pension)

Additional Benefits Available to Veterans

  • Social Security Administration (SSA)
  • Preference in federal hiring
  • Unemployment insurance (if actively seeking work)
  • Military retirement, medical severance and separation pay
  • State programs including tuition assistance, emergency funds, PTSD and grief counseling, soldiers’ homes and elder care, fiduciary and guardianship, license plates, hunting and fishing licenses, park passes, burial plots, claim assistance, access to discharge papers and other Veteran records

For detailed information about Service-Connected (S/A) Compensation, please see https://www.quailparkoflynnwood.com/va-benefits/

Partner Communities
QPL is part of the Living Care Lifestyles family of retirement communities. Living Care Lifestyles offers Senior Care and Memory Care in Arizona, California, Oregon, Texas and Washington. There are three Living Care communities in WA: Browns Point (Tacoma); West Seattle; and Lynnwood. The one in Lynnwood has received the Readers’ Choice Award for Independent Living from the Everett Herald.

Retirement and Assisted Living Apartments

  • Option for color customization of accent walls
  • Full-size kitchens
  • Major stainless steel appliances – range, microwave, refrigerator and dishwasher
  • Lovely wood cabinetry and granite countertops – kitchen and bath
  • Full-size washer and dryer
  • Walk-in closets
  • Walk-in showers with seat
  • Kitchenettes in studios
  • Air-conditioning in all apartments

These Retirement and Assisted Living Apartments come in four floor plans:

  • Studio – 364-598 s.f.
  • One Bedroom – 592-794 s.f.
  • One Bedroom Deluxe – 818-1,014 s.f.
  • Two Bedroom – 893-1,031 s.f.

Memory Care apts (23 suites) come in two floor plans:

  • Adjoining Shower – 374 s.f.
  • Private – 374-469 s.f.

Expansion floor plans fall into four types: EAL Suites (377 to 399 s.f./unit); Coho Studio Suite (499 s.f./unit); Chinook Suites (579 to 582 s.f./unit); and Sockeye Suite (828 s.f./unit).

The amenities at Lynnwood include pool, bistro and pub, movie theater, pet friendly, salon, 12-hour anytime dining, daily nurse, 24-hour awake team, maintenance 7 days a week, weekly housekeeping and linen service, concierge, and transportation.

Photos are courtesy of Quail Park of Lynnwood, including existing facilities and renderings of expansion facilities. For more photos, see https://www.quailparkoflynnwood.com/photos/. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Existing Facilities

 

Renderings of Expansion Facilities Under Construction

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Third Trumpet Show at Covenant Living at the Shores, Mercer Island

Posted by glennled on February 4, 2020

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Lake Washington view, courtesy of Covenant Living at the Shores, Mercer Island

 

“I lived on Mercer Island for 34 years before moving to Edmonds.” So said I to the 25 residents of Covenant Living at the Shores (CLS) who came on 20 December to Fellowship Hall to hear my Christmas season trumpet show, “Things Remembered.” It was my third performance at this lovely, waterfront retirement community. I came back at the kind invitation from Roxanne Helleren, Resident Life Director, and Kathryn Middleton, Life Enrichment Coordinator.

This one-hour show features 25 well-known, popular songs. Fourteen of them are Christmas songs which are mixed in with others that come mostly from hit musicals and movies. The songs are carefully chosen to match the typical phases of our lives: single, married, kids, family Christmas celebrations, empty nesting, and retirement. As I narrate, we remember the good things that we all experience, ponder, and are grateful for. The audience sings and hums the tunes, and I tell a few jokes. I used my Getzen trumpet and Super Olds cornet, my Harmon and straight mutes, and my Yamaha Allen Vizzutti mouthpiece.

I’ve written blog articles, with photos, after each of my previous shows here. Please use the Archives column on the left to find them and enjoy reading about those shows and CLS (formerly Covenant Shores):

  • “Showtune Favorites”—published on 24 May 2019
  • “I Stand for the Flag”—published on 16 July 2019

CLS’s website is http://www.covlivingshores.org.

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Meadowdale High School’s Winter Band and Orchestra Concert, Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on January 3, 2020

IMG_6052 - Full Orchestra

Full Orchestra, Meadowdale HIgh School, Edmonds, 12-17-2019

 

Seven different bands and orchestras from Meadowdale High School (MHS) in Edmonds performed a dozen pieces at the Winter Concert in the Great Hall on 17 December. My wife and I were there to see and hear our granddaughter play in the 22-member Concert Orchestra. Emily Hurd conducts the bands, and Nathan Rengstorf conducts the orchestras.

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Four trumpeters, MHS Wind Ensemble

The Concert Orchestra played “Greensleeves” and “Danza, II Allegro.” As a trumpet player and teacher, I especially enjoyed the Symphonic Band, Wind Ensemble, and Full Orchestra. “Minor Alterations: Christmas Through the Looking Glass” was the most memorable piece to me, and it was a huge treat to hear the Full Orchestra play “The Polar Express.” The 61-member Full Orchestra  blends strings with brass, woodwinds, and percussion for a big, colorful sound. The concert concluded with the Combined Orchestras (71 members, including two guitars and two percussion) playing “Boughs of Holly.”

The Meadowdale Arts & Music Booster Organization (MAMBO) was there to support and promote the school’s music program. Learn more about MAMBO at http://www.mhsMAMBO.org.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Full Orchestra

 

Wind Ensemble

 

Symphonic Band

 

Combined Orchestras

 

Chamber Orchestra

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Nathan Rengstorf, Conductor

Symphonic Orchestra

Concert Orchestra

MAMBO

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My Trumpet Student Solos at “Jazz Night” at Eckstein Middle School in Seattle

Posted by glennled on December 20, 2019

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Junior Jazz Band, Eckstein Middle School, Seattle

 

One hundred and eighty-six student musicians performed for a packed audience on “Jazz Night” on 21 November at Eckstein Middle School in Seattle. And one of them was a 6th grade trumpet player who has been taking private lessons from me since May 2018. I recall that he originally chose trumpet because it sounded “jazzy” (see my blog post of 12 May 2018). And here he was now, one and a half years later, my 42nd trumpet student, at this evening concert—the featured trumpet soloist when the 29-member Junior Jazz Band played “Second Line” (Joe Avery Blues). IMG_5627

Mr. Cuauhtémoc Escobedo (“Mr. E” or “Moc”) is Director of Bands, Jazz Band and Vocal Jazz. After the Junior Jazz Band opened the concert, Vocal Jazz II performed two songs.  Next, the 28-member Intermediate Jazz Band, with 7 trumpeters, played four pieces. Fourth on the program was Vocal Jazz I, the largest group (67 members). Lastly, the strong Senior Jazz Band (41 members, including 7 trumpeters) concluded the concert with five pieces.

As I sat again in Eckstein Auditorium, I was reminded of a former trumpet student of mine who also played in the winter concert there, also conducted by Mr. Escobedo, 8 years ago (please see my blog post of 14 December 2011). I remain in touch with his mom, a nurse. She says he continued to play trumpet in the concert, jazz, and pep bands through four years at two high schools. “Band was great for him,” she wrote to me. “It gave him a home wherever he went.” He’s now a senior at Western Washington University in Bellingham, studying manufacturing engineering. “He is quite the young man. I am very proud of him. He has had several 4.0 quarters and is on the Dean’s list. Hopefully, his job search will go well when he finishes.” IMG_5723

That prompted me to re-read my first blog post about him, then a sixth grader and my fourth student. (Please use the Archives in the left column to find 18 November 2009.) He sounded good in tone and articulation but was very frustrated, struggling with fingering, range, and reading music—no wonder—almost no one can teach themselves to play trumpet well. I wrote, “It is my pleasure to help this gentle boy overcome these obstacles. Let’s give the kid some successes! and who knows? maybe we’ll be listening to him play in the jazz, concert and marching bands soon…maybe in the symphony or opera orchestras someday…maybe on some CDs or in the movies when he’s that good. Let him dream! Help him dream! Help him achieve his potential. Or maybe he’ll simply enjoy playing in the school band with his friends for a few years and never take it any further…that’s fine, too. You find good people in bands. Good memories accumulate with the many events, and lifetime friendships often form–even marriages!”

My 42nd student, now at Eckstein, doesn’t struggle with trumpet the way my fourth student did. He’s quite talented and advanced for his age. But I feel the same about both of them. “Let’s give the kid some successes!…Let him dream!…Help him dream!”—and then watch what happens!

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

Junior Jazz Band

 

Intermediate Jazz Band

 

Senior Jazz Band

 

Vocal Jazz I & II

 

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New Student (#51) in Lynnwood Is in the Homeschool Connections Intermediate Jazz Band

Posted by glennled on December 18, 2019

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Classes for the Homeschool Connections Intermediate Jazz Band are held at Woodinville Alliance Church

 

My 51st trumpet student is my first homeschooled student. He now lives in Lynnwood, but until this year, he had been attending Harbour Pointe Middle School in Mukilteo, where he was a band member. When he and his parents decided to leave the public school system, he asked them, “What about playing trumpet in band?” They found the solution at Homeschool Connections (please see http://www.connectionsnw.org).

He participates in the Intermediate Jazz Band class on Wednesdays at Woodinville Alliance Church (http://www.wachurch.us/). There was an evening band concert on 2 December at Northlake Christian Church in Bothell (see http://www.northlakecc.org). It was called the Connections Christmas Concert, featuring the Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Bands; Intermediate and Advanced Jazz Bands; and Jazz Combo.

My first private, half-hour lesson with him was on 20 November. I always listen to my students play before I choose an instruction book for them. From his middle school band days, he still has the Essential Elements, Trumpet, Book 1, so we decided to keep working out of that. In addition, I had him buy 101 Jazz Songs, Trumpet, published by Hal Leonard, so that he can have fun becoming familiar with some well-known pieces.

I found that his range topped out at D on the staff. So, on the first day, I taught him to play “G” above the staff, and before I left, he had played a note above high C above the staff. Also, he was making an “H” sound into the mouthpiece. Students who do that will not be able to play at fast tempos or learn double- and triple-tonguing. So, I taught him to make a “T” sound into the mouthpiece. He now has to work to make these techniques natural and habitual.

At this stage, my first job is to help him learn the fingering and embouchure positions for each note in the chromatic scale. We want him to develop instant recognition of the names and settings for each note within a two-octave range, low to high G. It is not enough to memorize things intellectually. We must learn by doing. That means “practice, practice, practice.”

I asked how he chose the trumpet. He said there was no demonstration at school where he could try playing various instruments. He chose trumpet from photographs!

According to the Homeschool Connections website, the Intermediate Jazz Band is taught by Robin Strangland. She plays and teaches French horn and plays trumpet in the Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra (SWOJO—see http://www.swojo.org). She started the Homeschool Band in this area in 1993. She and her husband run the Northend Jazz Camp. The Advanced Jazz Ensemble is taught by Kevin Hall, trumpeter. He is a Director of Jazz at Henry M. Jackson High School in Mill Creek. Twice, he has received the prestigious “Outstanding Soloist Award” from the International Association of Jazz Educators. He is a Festival Director for the Snohomish Valley and Mill Creek Jazz Festivals. You’ll find more information about both these instructors at http://www.connectionsnw.org/about-us/.

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Milestone: 50th Trumpet Student Attends Carl Sandburg Elementary School in Kirkland

Posted by glennled on December 16, 2019

Carl Sandburg Elem School, Kirkland, 12-13-'19

Carl Sandburg Elementary School, Kirkland

I don’t have a studio in my home where private trumpet students can come for lessons. I’m not affiliated with a music store or company that has practice studios, although I do occasionally use the rooms at Ted Brown Music in the University District, which rents studios. If I had my own or a company studio, I think I’d have reached this milestone–50 trumpet students–much earlier. So, since I started in 2009, I’ve been driving to people’s homes and teaching my students in their living rooms or basements or wherever.

My 50th student is a quiet, cute, petite girl with a charming smile who attends 4th grade at the Carl Sandburg Elementary School (CSES) in Kirkland. The Music Teacher there is Mr. Bryan Melerski. He conducted a recital at the school on 17 December at which my student’s ensemble played three pieces. Her group consists of trumpet, trombone, baritone, flute and clarinet players.

Our first lesson was on 19 November. She recalled how she chose trumpet. The trombone and baritone were too big for her to carry home. So she tried playing the trumpet first, then the flute and clarinet, and finally, the trumpet again. She made a good sound that she liked. Also, the trumpet had only three valves, and she liked pushing down the buttons. That was it—the choice was easy. She’s smart, earnest, and pleasant. She’s had piano lessons in the past, and her music knowledge is far better than other 4th grade students I’ve taught. Some techniques and skills just seem to come naturally to her. She shows good promise.

According to the CSES’s website, enrollment was 459 in October 2017, and there were 27 teachers, 70% of whom had at least a Master’s Degree.  The unexcused absence rate was 0.3%. Carl Sandburg (1878-1967) was a famous, popular American poet, journalist, biographer, and editor. He won three Pulitzer Prizes (1919, 1940, and 1951). Born in Illinois, he lived and worked in Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Puerto Rico, Wisconsin, Michigan, and North Carolina, where he died at age 89. Numerous schools are named after him throughout America.

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“Showtune Favorites,” My Trumpet Show at Fairwinds, Redmond Retirement Community

Posted by glennled on December 13, 2019

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Fairwinds, Redmond, a Leisure Care Retirement Community

 

About 30 residents of Fairwinds, Redmond gathered on 16 November to hear my trumpet show, “Showtune Favorites.” For one hour, I played 25 hit songs from musicals and movies of the residents’ era, such as “Over the Rainbow,” “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’,” “The Way You Look Tonight,” “Bali Hai,” “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “If I Were a Rich Man,” “Hello Dolly,” and “You’re a Grand Old Flag.” And along the way, I told a few jokes.

I brought three horns—my Getzen trumpet, Super Olds cornet, and Jupiter pocket trumpet—along with a Denis Wick 4 mouthpiece to make the cornet sound like a flugelhorn. And I used either a Harmon and straight mute for certain tunes. Fun!

Randee Young is the Guest Services Manager at Fairwinds, Redmond. When I return here someday, I’ll perform a different show—I have six.

Fairwinds, Redmonds

This facility is among the family of 53 Leisure Care retirement communities located in 18 states (https://www.leisurecare.com/our-communities). There are 9 in Washington state. Fairwinds, Redmond offers independent and assisted living accommodations and amenities in the Education Hill neighborhood. There are 22 floor plans and two dining venues, along with a private dining room, fitness room, pool, theater, salon, game room, activity room, patio, and garden. The size of the apartments range from 468 s.f. for a studio to 1,504 s.f. for a two-bedroom with den. Please see https://www.leisurecare.com/our-communities/fairwinds-redmond.

Two photos of the entrance (below) were taken by me. All others in this article are courtesy of Fairwinds, Redmond. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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