Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

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Archive for March, 2019

Spring Band Concert, Skyview Middle School, Bothell

Posted by glennled on March 18, 2019

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2018-19 Fifth Grade Band, Skyview Middle School, Bothell

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Dan Carlson, Band and Orchestra Director, Skyview Middle School, Bothell

The Spring Band Concert at Skyview Middle School in Bothell was really two concerts on one night: one at 6 p.m. and the other at 7 p.m. on 13 March 2019. The first part was by the fifth and sixth grade bands. The second was by the 7th and 8th grade bands. Both are under the baton of Conductor Dan Carlson.

The 5th grade band performed 8 short pieces from Standard of Excellence, Book I, by Bruce Pearson and one sheet music piece, “Yankee Doodle.” Mr. Carlson is the SMS Band and Orchestra Director. Students in this band come from four nearby elementary schools: Canyon Creek, Crystal Springs, Fernwood, and Lockwood. Mr. Carlson is assisted by three sectional instructors: Jane Lin (percussion), Tyler Rogers (woodwinds), and me (brass—i.e., trumpet and trombone).

The 6th grade band performed “Canto and Caprice” by James Curnow; “Dueling Dragons” by Robert W. Smith; and “Legend of the Alhambra” by Mark Williams. All but three of the 17 brass players at the concert were in my class last year.

I did not stay for second concert by the Jazz Band, 7th Grade Band, and 8th Grade Band which started at 7 p.m., but, here again, most of the brass players were in my class when they first started.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

Fifth Grade Band

 

Sixth Grade Band

 

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Five Trumpet Pieces for the Mark R. Heglund (65) Funeral at Evergreen-Washelli in Seattle

Posted by glennled on March 2, 2019

Last week, the weather forecast for Thursday, 28 February, was for snow. Oh, no! I was booked to play three pieces at the funeral service of Mark Richard Heglund (65) at Evergreen-Washelli Funeral Home and Cemetery in north Seattle. One piece would be inside the chapel, and the other two would be outdoors. Thankfully, it turned out to be a sunny-bright day with a clear, deep-blue sky and a cool, calm 45 degrees. Perfect! IMG_2782

The program called for a trio to present “Pie Jesu” by Andrew Lloyd Webber—Laurie Geyer (soprano soloist), accompanied by Laurie McFarland (pianist) and me on my Getzen trumpet (see my blog post of 14 December 2015). Laurie sang in Latin, and the title, Pie Jesu (Pious Jesus) is usually translated, “O Sweet Jesus.” Here, He is asked for forgiveness, mercy, peace and rest.

Mark’s surviving sister, Helene (Heglund) Reed, chose the music. I was referred to her by the very professional funeral director, Ryan Rasmussen. She gave a moving eulogy for her older brother and presented a lovely video about him and their family. He was born on 15 May 1953 and died on 11 February 2019, after suffering during his last years from cancer and pneumonia. He was a successful commercial real estate agent, investor, developer, and landlord. He loved basketball, Seattle Supersonics, Golden State Warriors, demolition, Chinook’s Restaurant, University Presbyterian Church, family, friends, people, jokes, road trips, art history, antiques, trumpet, Herb Alpert, and Jesus. Mark was a gifted musician, playing drums and trumpet in the school band. In Boy Scouts, he loved “Reveille” and “Taps” and earned the “esteemed Eagle Scout rank.” A good man who lived a good life. While I’m no Herb Alpert, I am grateful to have been chosen to play Mark’s favorite instrument at his memorial service.

When the service ended and the pallbearers carried the casket to the coach waiting outside the chapel, I played “Amazing Grace.” At the grave site, I played the bugle call, “Funeral March,” as the pallbearers carried the casket to the grave. There, Laurie (Mark’s cousin), sang “The Lord’s Prayer.” At the close of the service, I played “Il Silenzio” (The Silence), a song written in 1965 by Italian trumpeter, Nini Rosso, which became a worldwide hit and is now a standard.

Finally, as the casket was lowered into the grave, I played “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” One of the verses has been translated from the Latin thus:

O come, O Branch of Jesse’s tree,
free them from Satan’s tyranny
that trust thy mighty power to save,
and give them victory o’er the grave.

Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
shall come to you, O Israel.

Here are links to some worldwide favorite renditions of “Pie Jesu” and “Il Silenzio”:

Pie Jesu https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=K6RSB39DMfM

Il Silenzio:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmK-uaYFBJc

 

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It Happens—My Young 46th Trumpet Student Drops Out

Posted by glennled on March 1, 2019

He’s a precocious 8 year old, and I was his second trumpet teacher—for one lesson only! He’s had two years of piano lessons (which continue) and just recently took up trumpet. After making a thorough study, online for months, of numerous instruments, he chose trumpet because of its sound. He likes Wynton Marsalis and Miles Davis. His parents trumpet-clipart-photo-book[1]rented him a Yahoo trumpet from Ted Brown Music in the University District of Seattle. The trips to his first tutor’s studio proved to be too far a commute for the mom, so he dropped after two lessons. Then she found me at http://www.lessonsinyourhome.com. I drove to his home on 21 February with high hopes despite his youth.

He already knows the fingerings of the notes in the C-major scale within his range, which is two octaves–truly exceptional for his age and the very short time that he’s been playing. His tone is solid. He’s rolling his lips inward toward his teeth as he climbs into the upper register—something that many fifth graders find unnatural and difficult. He is eager to learn more and does so quickly. To me, he’s an ideal student.

For the next lesson, I asked him to practice two pages in his instruction book (Standard of Excellence by Bruce Pearson) and improve on three things: tonguing, lip placement, and breathing. He was making an “H” sound into the mouthpiece and needs to change to a “T” sound. In the lower register, he was letting his lower lip creep out of the mouthpiece so that he could make the buzz with the inside of his lips. Indeed, he should roll his lips outward in the lower register, but both lips need to remain inside the mouthpiece cup. He was breathing through his nose and needs to breathe through the corners of his mouth. When we parted, I told him he is going to be a star. Smiles, shining eyes.

He’s very bright, self-motivated and disciplined. His mom says he practices piano often and on his own initiative, sometimes for up to two hours. He’s played in four piano recitals. In addition, he sings in a choir and loves it. He’s a happy boy. His two older siblings play piano and drums. His father studied voice at the famed Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

But alas, his mom says they now need to stop these lessons for budgetary concerns. Oh, ah, hmmm…well, no worries. He’s a musician, just finding his way. Godspeed.

Posted in New Students - Intro Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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