Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

  • July 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « Jun    
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    28293031  
  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 65 other followers

  • Subscribe

Posts Tagged ‘Getzen’

My Early Return with a Different Trumpet Show to Ida Culver House, Broadview Retirement Community in North Seattle

Posted by glennled on July 22, 2019

 

Ida Culver House, Broadview, north Seattle

Ida Culver House, Broadview, 12505 Greenwood Ave N., Seattle—an Era Living retirement community. Photo courtesy of ICHB.

They came back on 11 July! “They love you!” said Dana, speaking of the residents of Ida Culver House, Broadview (ICHB) in north Seattle who came back to hear my second one-hour trumpet show in two months (please see my blog post of 9 June 2019).

Dana is the kind, helpful assistant who, with another good lady, Monica, set up the room for me where I played another of my five trumpet shows. This one is called “Showtune Favorites: Hit Songs from Musicals and Movies.” It consists of 25 such songs, including “Over the Rainbow,” “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’,” “The Way You Look Tonight,” “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “If I Were a Rich Man,” “Hello Dolly,” and “Hopelessly Devoted to You.” They sang along (or hummed) and laughed (or groaned) at my jokes and riddles.

For different sound effects appropriate to each song, I used two trumpets, one cornet, four mouthpieces, one harmon mute, and one straight mute. The trumpets are by Getzen (Severinsen) and Jupiter, the cornet is by Olds, and the mouthpieces are by Yamaha (Vizzutti), Denis Wick, and Bach.

Ida Culver pioneered two of the 8 retirement communities now in the Era Living group. Two are named for her—this one and the one in Ravenna, which she originally created as a home for retired teachers.

Posted in Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Independence Day: “I Stand for the Flag” Trumpet Show at Fairwinds Brighton Court in Lynnwood, After the Edmonds Parade

Posted by glennled on July 21, 2019

IMG_2445 (2)

Partial view of audience, “I Stand for the Flag” trumpet show at Fairwinds Brighton Court, Lynnwood, Independence Day, 2019

 

It was a special joy, coming back to Fairwinds Brighton Court in Lynnwood to perform my second one-hour trumpet show there. The audience was large—about 60. It’s where my dear mother-in-law, Ruth MacDonald, occupied Room 344 for three years, and she used to love to come to the room pictured above to hear musicians play and sing.

IMG_2450

Juna Davies, piano, accompanies Glenn Ledbetter, Getzen trumpet

This time, my show was “I Stand for the Flag,” comprised of 25 patriotic marches and songs. It was on Independence Day, the Fourth of July, in the afternoon, right after I had marched among other veterans in the Edmonds Parade, carrying the Navy flag and my Getzen bugle. My former performance at Brighton Court was of another of my shows, “Showtune Favorites” (please see my blog post of 29 September 2018).

At both performances, I was accompanied on the piano for certain songs by Juna Davies, a fellow resident and friend of Ruth’s. Together, we played six songs this time:

  • “The Navy Hymn” (Eternal Father, Strong to Save)
  • “This is My Country”
  • “America the Beautiful”
  • “God Bless America”
  • “You’re a Grand Old Flag”
  • “The Star-Spangled Banner”

Photos are courtesy of Fairwinds Brighton Court. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations, Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Flag Day: Four Patriotic Songs Accompany Speech About “Flags Across America” at Cristwood Park Senior Living Community in Shoreline

Posted by glennled on June 24, 2019

IMG_0492 (2)

Flags Across America, Arlington National Cemetery (pp. 100-101)

 

Flag Day, 14 June—where were you? Did you display the American flag at your home? Did you attend a ceremony? I did and hope you did, too.

cristwood.communities.2

Cristwood Park, Shoreline. Photo courtesy of Cristwood Park

Two days earlier, on 12 June, I attended an event at Cristwood Park, a retirement community in Shoreline. Elizabeth Patton, Life Enrichment Coordinator, had scheduled Karen S. Robbins, co-author of Flags Across America, who lives in Gig Harbor, to give a speech about the American flags which are pictured in her book. Mrs. Patton scheduled me to play two patriotic songs on my Getzen trumpet before and two songs after Ms. Robbins’ speech. The first two were “America, the Beautiful” and “God Bless America.” The last two were “You’re a Grand Old Flag” and “The Star-Spangled Banner.” We handed out the lyrics to all of them, and the audience sang along as I played.

Ms. Robbins teamed up and co-authored the 208-page book with Dale Baskin, a photographer and writer who lives in Seattle.  So, she began her speech with a joke about their team being akin to the very popular ice cream shops, “Baskin-Robbins.” Then she showed many photos of American flag, as photographed, drawn and painted by people across the nation. All were unique, and some were simply amazing. See for yourself at https://www.flagsacrossamerica.org/.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Seminars, Lectures & Workshops, Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Milestone—My 200th Sounding of “Taps”—at Rotary Club, Mercer Island

Posted by glennled on June 17, 2019

61759570_315954902667791_5471344119521476608_n

Glenn Ledbetter, VFW Post 1040 Bugler, sounds “Taps” for 200th time, 5-28-2019.

On Monday, 27 May, the nation observed Memorial Day, and I sounded “Taps” at Veterans Park in Lynnwood. The next day, I sounded it twice. In the morning, it was for a Hmong pilot who fought with America in the Vietnam War. The ceremony was held at the Hero’s Café in the Verdant Community Wellness Center in Lynnwood. In the afternoon, it was for those Americans who died while in military service, as remembered by members of the Rotary Club on Mercer Island. That ceremony was held at a luncheon in the Mercer Island Community Center, and it was the 200th time I’ve sounded “Taps” during the 9 years that I have been VFW Post 1040 Bugler. As usual, I used by lovely Getzen bugle at both ceremonies.

It’s a significant milestone for me, but buglers who live near a national or state veterans cemetery quickly and easily surpass my number. Some buglers have sounded “Taps” more than 5,000 times!

61800276_593599461127125_4803509458414075904_n

Rev. Greg Asimakoupoulos (L) and Glenn Ledbetter (R

Let’s see—the first of my 200 was on 16 July 2011. Let’s call it 9 years ago. That’s an average of about 22 per year. Q: At that rate, how many more years will it take me to reach 5,000 soundings? A: 218. Q: How old will I be then? A: Almost 300. Forget it…trying for some goals just isn’t worth it.

I lived on Mercer Island for 34 years and served on the City’s Planning Commission for 10. It was Rev. Greg Asimakoupoulos, Chaplain at Covenant Shores Retirement Community, who invited me to sound “Taps” after his short speech at the end of the Rotary Club luncheon. Please see https://glennstrumpetnotes.com/2018/05/24/trumpet-show-at-covenant-shores-retirement-community-on-mercer-island/.

Photos are by Rev. Greg Asimakoupoulos.

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

“To the Color” and “Taps” at 5th Annual Memorial Day Ceremony at Edmonds Community College

Posted by glennled on June 10, 2019

DSC_0229-673x420

March to “Boots to Books” Monument. Photo by My Edmonds News.

 

The annual Memorial Day Ceremony at Edmonds Community College (ECC), held this year on 22 May at the Black Box Theatre, just keeps improving. This is the sixth such ceremony. The structure remains the same, and I think the execution is better. For one thing, Lt. Col. Jon Ramer, USAF (Ret.) was an excellent Master of Ceremonies. After his 25-year career, he is now the Veterans Event Coordinator for the City of Mill Creek. The excellent keynote speaker was Joe Wankelman, U.S. Army (Ret.).

DSC_0236-597x420

Myra Rintamaki, Gold Star Mother, escorted by Chris Szarek, Director, VRC. Photo by My Edmonds News.

There was a variety of music at various times in the program. Prior to the event, as the audience filed into their seats, the excellent five-member ECC Brass Ensemble played numerous pieces—two trumpets, French horn, trombone, and tuba, led by Stacey Eliason, ECC music faculty member. Peter Ali improvised on two of his flutes. Linda Kappus provided piano accompaniment as the audience sang the “Star-Spangled Banner” and “America the Beautiful.” Toby Beard played three songs on the bagpipes. And I sounded two bugle calls, “To the Color,” and “Taps.” I’ve been the bugler at all six of these ECC ceremonies. I use my beloved Getzen bugle.

For more information (including photos) about this annual ceremony and its sponsor, the ECC Veterans Resource Center (VRC), please see my blog posts of:

  • 31 May 2018
  • 28 June 2017
  • 20 July 2016
  • 18 August 2015
  • 17 June 2014

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Trumpet Show, “I Stand for the Flag,” at Ida Culver House Broadview in North Seattle

Posted by glennled on June 9, 2019

ICH-Broadview-senior-living-building-entrance-exterior

Entrance, Ida Culver House, Broadview in North Seattle

 

On 21 May, I gave my first performance of my trumpet show, “I Stand for the Flag,” a collection of 25 patriotic marches, songs, a bugle call, and a hymn. The venue was Ida Culver House, Broadview, a retirement community in north Seattle. For one hour, I entertained the residents with pieces such as “Semper Fidelis,” “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again,” “Over There,” “Shenandoah,” “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” (The Navy Hymn), “God Bless America,” “America the Beautiful,” and “You’re a Grand Old Flag.”

The residents sang along and, in between songs, laughed (or groaned) at my jokes. I introduced each song with a wee bit of information about it, such as when it was written by whom or with what branch of the service it is associated or what famous singers made recordings of it, etc.

Dressed in my VFW uniform, I used four Bb instruments: my Getzen trumpet, Super Olds cornet, Getzen bugle, and Jupiter pocket trumpet.

On the bugle, I sounded my favorite call, “Tattoo,” which nightly is played 15 minutes before “Taps,” which signals lights out at 10 p.m. For the mournful “Shenandoah,” I played my cornet with a Denis Wick 4 mouthpiece which makes it sound like a flugelhorn. For “The Navy Hymn,” I used my regular Bach 8C cornet mouthpiece. My Jupiter pocket trumpet was my choice for playing “You’re a Grand Old Flag.” And for the marches and most other pieces, I used my Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet (please see my blog post of 14 December 2015), with either a Bach 8C or Bach 1.5C mouthpiece. For me, the 8C plays easier in the high range, and the 1.5C does better in the low range.

Ida Culver House, Broadview (ICHB)

This retirement community is part of the Era Living family of 8 such communities in the Greater Seattle area (please see https://www.eraliving.com/communities/broadview/). ICHB offers facilities and services for independent, assisted living, skilled nursing, short-term rehabilitation, and memory care. Stephanie Butler, Life Enrichment Coordinator, offered me this opportunity to entertain the ICHB residents.

ICH-Broadview-senior-living-building-new-exterior-of-Cottage

Private cottage residences

ICHB has 245 residences with floor plans ranging from studios and three-bedroom apartments to single family cottages with garages! From some vantage points, there are breathtaking views of Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains. Residents enjoy a lavishly landscaped garden courtyard, refreshing saltwater pool, elegant décor, and fine dining.

Amenities include:

  • Vibrant Life Enrichment programs
  • Café Bistro and billiards
  • Elegant restaurant with an in-house chef
  • On-site Wellness Center staffed by a nurse and caregivers
  • Emergency call and daily check-in system
  • Weekly housekeeping and linen services
  • Maintenance services
  • Personal* and group transportation
  • Access to public transit
  • EnhanceFitness classes
  • Swimming pool & spa
  • Beautiful outdoor amenities, lush garden, and terrace seating
  • Full-service, on-site beauty salon and massage therapy studio*
  • Library and Media Room
  • Fireside lounge
  • Professionally curated art collections
  • Resident garage* & street level parking available

* Additional fee

ICH-Broadview-senior-living-residents-karate-class1

Fitness class

Residence Features include:

  • Full kitchens
  • Cable TV and internet access
  • All utilities except telephone
  • Easy-access shower
  • Bath tubs in select residences
  • Individually controlled heating
  • Washer & dryer in select apartments
  • Private decks or patios in select residences
  • Emergency call system
  • Additional storage available
  • Pet-friendly

Sample Floor Plans and Starting Monthly Fees: please see https://www.eraliving.com/communities/broadview/floor-plans/.

Photos are courtesy of Ida Culver House, Broadview. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

“Taps” and “The Navy Hymn” for Burials-at-Sea in Puget Sound Off the Ferry, Spokane

Posted by glennled on May 11, 2019

 

IMG_4040

“Let me go”—Joseph P. Doyon, 1922-2018

 

At about 9:50 a.m. on Saturday, 4 May, the Washington State Ferry, Spokane, enroute from Edmonds to Kingston, cut her engines and drifted for about five minutes in the ebb tide of Puget Sound while the ashes of Joseph P. Doyon and his oldest son, Paul, were committed to the sea. Joe died on 13 September 2018, age 95. His last home was in Tigard, Oregon, and his funeral service was held at Finley Sunset Hills Park and Mortuary in Portland on 7 October 2018. Paul died on 9 December 2017, age 62.

dav

Glenn Ledbetter plays “The Navy Hymn” aboard the ferry, Spokane

Joe was a World War II Navy veteran who participated in the D-Day landing at Normandy. I sounded “Taps” on my Getzen bugle, and the ferry captain gave three long blasts of the ship’s whistle in honor of him. As the ferry engines powered up and the ferry came up to speed, I closed the ceremony by playing “The Navy Hymn” on my Getzen trumpet. The family sang two verses:

Eternal Father, strong to save,
Whose arm hath bound the restless wave,
Who bids the mighty ocean deep
Its own appointed limits keep;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,
For those in peril on the sea!

Lord, guard and guide the men who fly
And those who on the ocean ply;
Be with our troops upon the land,
And all who for their country stand:
Be with these guardians day and night
And may their trust be in thy might.

Dale, Joe’s younger son, and his wife, Michelle, arranged this event. Michelle said that Joe loved to fish, golf and dance and was very sociable all his life. She called him a great man with many friends, a very hard worker, and a true gentleman. He spent many years writing the memoirs of his four years in the Navy and his WWII experiences. Dale intends to publish them soon. Michelle said that had Joe attended his own burial-at-sea ceremony, he would have said, “This is Marvelous!”

IMG_1473 - Joe Doyon (center with pistol in hand) - note caption (2)

Joe Doyon is standing (center) with pistol in hand during the Normandy invasion, 6 June 1944. The caption reads, “German prisoners were carried back to the west bank of the Rhine in landing boats. Prisoners on the boat fish some comrades out of the drink.”

IMG_2273 - Joe Doyon

Joseph Paul Doyon, 1922-2018, U.S. Navy veteran, WWII

Fourteen family members attended; one daughter, JoAnn Watson, traveled from Arizona. Among others taking photos was a step-grandson, Matthew, an Eagle Scout and a trumpeter.

Joe was born in Augusta, Maine in 1922, and served in the Navy from 1943-1946. He became a Motor Machinist Mate Second Class. At age 21, he was aboard one of the first amphibious landing boats at Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1944. Joe was awarded many medals (see photo). He was a member of the U.S. LST Association (see https://www.uslst.org/). He lived in Edmonds, Washington for about 45 years and had a 41-year career at University Swaging, shaping and joining metals for its clients. In 1987, he retired as Vice President and Manager of the Boat Division. He also lived for several years on a houseboat on Lake Union. Joe and Paul often fished in Appletree Cove and off Apple Cove Point near Kingston. It was Joe’s favorite spot. Paul’s death was devastating to his father. Joe had six children (two boys and four girls), four step-children, 12 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren.

Burial-at-Sea Memorial Services

If approved by the Washington State Ferry Service, burial-at-sea memorial services are free but subject to the ferry captain’s final discretion due to weather or unforeseen operational issues. Cancelled services may be moved to another vessel or rescheduled. Advanced reservations are required, and memorials are permitted on six routes only: IMG_2884 (2)

  • Seattle/Bremerton
  • Seattle/Bainbridge
  • Edmonds/Kingston
  • Mukilteo/Clinton
  • Anacortes/Friday Harbor/Orcas
  • Port Townsend/Coupeville

Permissible times are during non-peak hours only:

  • Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Saturday/Sunday, prior to 10 a.m.

Ashes must be contained in so-called “journey urns” which dissolve quickly after being dropped in the water.

Reflections

Memorial ceremonies call us, compel us, to reflect upon our own mortality. Each person who participated in or witnessed the Doyon burial-at-sea had his/her own memories and thoughts about the deceased father and son, life, and death. I did not know the Doyons, but here are my personal thoughts, brought up from the deep to the surface of me by this burial-at-sea.

First, Joe’s military service. I am immensely grateful to Joe and his generation. Without their values and fortitude, we Americas probably would now be speaking German or Japanese. Joe was a veteran who served with honor and survived D-Day. And as Jose N. Harris wrote, “A Veteran is someone, who at one point in their life, wrote a blank check payable to the United States of America for an amount up to, and including, their life.” And as Jesus said, “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” And as Raelynn Ricarte of Hood River, Oregon, who lost her son, a Marine Corps Captain, says, “Be an American worth dying for.” The Doyon family lost such a man—Joe. I bugle for such men and women. IMG_4135

Second, Joe’s disappearance. Through cremation, the major parts of the bodies of Joe and Paul were combusted, vaporized, and oxidized. Their ashes (mostly pulverized bone fragments) have now been separated, mixed and scattered in 3-D salt water. Their particles may someday settle to the sea bottom, or circulate in the North Pacific gyre, or be taken up into the atmosphere and fall again in the rain on a distant continent or ocean, circulating here and there around the globe throughout the ages. At various times in various places, their particles probably will be chemically broken down into their inherent molecules and even reformed into other compounds. By choice, Joe’s and Paul’s bodies are no more, vanished without trace, except in memories and images. “Let me go” was Joe’s last message, expressed in the program at his funeral service in Portland last fall. Last Saturday, his and Paul’s ashes blended with nature.

IMG_0923[1]

Dale and Michelle Doyon hold Dale’s father’s ashes in the biodegradable urn as the ferry, Spokane, approaches the Edmonds landing

Third, Joe’s life lessons for me—the afterlife. Job said, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return there” (Job 1:21). God said to Adam, “…for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return” (Gen 3:19). But wait—the assemblages of organic matter that were identified as Joe and Paul are disintegrated, lost, gone. And my body, also, will be cremated. But wait again—Joe left his memoirs. Was he a believer? I don’t know. But it’s clear that Joe pondered such things in his heart. There is a saying, “There are no atheists in foxholes.” In other words (according to the saying), when under extreme stress, all people believe in, hope for, even call upon and appeal to a higher power. Joe certainly had been in the line of fire. How did it form him or change him, spiritually? Perhaps his memoirs will tell us.

But wait yet again—Joe is gone. I will follow, but for now, I’m still here, still vertical, still thinking, feeling, and kicking, “Stayin’ Alive, Stayin’ Alive,” as the Bee Gees sing. Is death the end of me? C.S. Lewis said, “You don’t have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body.” Ah! Despite cremation and even burial-at-sea, our distinct, individual identities, our being, are preserved.

Change is the only constant in life, said Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher. “To every thing there is a season, and a time for every purpose under the heaven” (Ecclesiastes 3:1). And Lord Alfred Tennyson writes in his poem, The Brook, about how the water keeps on flowing after we are gone. The brook is the narrator:

I chatter, chatter, as I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

“Change…a season…a time…heaven…forever…” The tide comes in and goes out. Day changes to night, and winter passes into spring. Years turn into eons. Millions multiply into billions, and so on. We die, and life goes on without us. But no, ultimately, the brook also will not survive. Scientists say that Earth itself will be consumed by the expanding Sun. The Sun, too, will die. The whole Milky Way Galaxy will be swallowed by a Black Hole. Everything—an atom, a toothpick, an aircraft carrier, a solar system, a galaxy—has a life cycle. Perhaps even a Black Hole. Perhaps even our entire universe. But, by definition, not Heaven. There dwells the Absolute, the Infinite, the great I AM, in Eternity. Endless time. No more cycles. Everlasting life in love, peace and joy. Justice—the triumph of Good. The promised ideal, made possible only by Grace.

In Mere Christianity, C.S. Lewis said, “I am trying here to prevent anyone saying the really foolish thing that people often say about Him: I’m ready to accept Jesus as a great moral teacher, but I don’t accept his claim to be God. That is the one thing we must not say. A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic—on the level with the man who says he is a poached egg—or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse. You can shut him up for a fool, you can spit at him and kill him as a demon or you can fall at his feet and call him Lord and God, but let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about his being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.”

In his song, “Gotta Serve Somebody,” Bob Dylan sings:

ce2c2640992bb117c2677db77efb7cd5--fashion-sketches-sketch-inspiration[1]

“Laughing Jesus” by Segura

“You may be an ambassador to England or France
You may like to gamble, you might like to dance
You may be the heavyweight champion of the world
You may be a socialite with a long string of pearls…

“You may call me Terry, you may call me Timmy
You may call me Bobby, you may call me Zimmy
You may call me R.J., you may call me Ray
You may call me anything but no matter what you say

“You’re gonna have to serve somebody, yes
Indeed you’re gonna have to serve somebody
Well, it may be the devil or it may be the Lord
But you’re gonna have to serve somebody”

The fool says in his heart, “There is no God” (Psalms 53:1). Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me (John 14:6). No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him: and I will raise him up at the last day (John 6:44). In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also (John 14:2-3). Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid (John 14:27). Then he [one of the two criminals who were crucified with Jesus] said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” He replied, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise” (Luke 23:42-43). In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed…O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? (I Corinthians 15:52,55).

Photos are courtesy of the Doyon family. Please click on any photo below to enlarge it.

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

St. Patrick’s Day Private Concert in Condo of an Irish Couple in Edmonds

Posted by glennled on May 7, 2019

54524338_10218355189773992_1274959671723032576_n[1]

L to R: DeeDee Kelly, Nancy MacDonald, and Robert E. Kelly

Sunday, the 17th of March, was St. Patrick’s Day, celebrating the life of the patron saint of Ireland who died during Lent on this date in 461 A.D. My wife’s cousin and her husband, DeeDee and Bob Kelly, in Edmonds are thoroughly Irish, so I offered to play a few Irish tunes for them in their own condominium. They chose five traditional Irish songs:

  • “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling”
  • “Danny Boy”
  • “Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral”
  • “Molly Malone”
  • “My Wild Irish Rose”

I played three instruments: my Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet, Super Olds cornet, and Jupiter pocket trumpet.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Musical Events at Home | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration—My Trumpet Show at University House, Issaquah

Posted by glennled on March 30, 2019

 

University-House-Issaquah

University House, Issaquah

On the 15th of March, two days before the actual St. Patrick’s Day, my one-hour trumpet show, “St. Patrick’s Day Celebration,” was listed on the calendar of University House, free-shamrock-clip-art-9BXAvf-clipart[1]Issaquah (UHI) as only one of seven events scheduled that day. Compared to many retirement homes, that’s a lot of activities for the residents to choose among when they ask in the morning, “What shall we do today?”

th5STAXPZ1So, at 3:00 p.m., about 50 of them showed up in Gilman Auditorium to hear me play 27 Irish tunes on my three horns and tell a dozen Irish jokes. Amber Duffy, Life Enrichment Director, had advertised the event thusly on the UHI Calendar: “St. Patrick’s Day Happy Hour with the Irish Trumpet.” And it was grand.

Among the ballads, jig, and reels that I played were many old favorite traditional songs, including “My Wild Irish Rose,” “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling,” “Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral,” “Molly Malone,” and “Danny Boy.” Others included “Chicken Reel,” “The Irish Washerwoman,” “St. Patrick’s Day,” “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” “Whiskey in the Jar,” “The Irish Rover,” and “The Rocky Road to Dublin.”

For most of them, I used my Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet; for several, I played my Super Olds cornet; and for one, the finale, I played my Jupiter pocket trumpet.

Here’s a sample joke:

The doctor was puzzled and said, “I’m very sorry, Mr. O’Flaherty, but I can’t diagnose your trouble. I think it must be the—alcohol.”
“Don’t worry about it, Dr. Cullen, I know how you feel. I’ll come back when you’re sober.”

When the show ended, I handed out a sheet containing 22 good, clean Irish jokes, encouraging the residents to have some fun on the phone, the internet, or in person with their grandchildren and others during the festive weekend.

University House, Issaquah

UHI is one of eight Era Living Retirement Communities (please see https://www.eraliving.com/communities/issaquah/). It offers senior independent living CaringStar2019[1] and assisted living care, but it is not an average senior living community. It has unique partnerships with the University of Washington’s Schools of Nursing, Social Work and Pharmacy and the UW Retirement Association in order to deliver innovative programs designed to foster healthy living.

It appeals to residents who “share a passion for knowledge, a fascination with art and culture, and the desire to stay active in mind, body, and spirit.” The community has “a distinct academic flavor where residents enjoy a connection to UW programs and a commitment to lifelong learning.”

Amenities:

  • Elegant restaurant, flexible dining options, variety of cuisines, in-house chef
  • Vibrant Life Enrichment programs [such as my trumpet show]
  • Reception
  • On-site Wellness Center, nurse, caregivers
  • Emergency call and daily check-in system
  • Maintenance services
  • Weekly housekeeping and linen services
  • Personal and group transportation services
  • Swimming pool
  • Fitness center featuring EnhanceFitness classes
  • Full-service, on-site salon*
  • Two solariums
  • Garden courtyards
  • Game and crafts room
  • Library
  • Internet Cafe
  • Professionally curated art collections
  • Auditorium for large gatherings and events [such as my trumpet show]
  • Resident parking*
  • *Additional fee

Residence Features:

  • Full kitchens
  • Easy-access shower, bathing benches, grab bars
  • Individually controlled heating
  • Ceiling fans
  • All utilities included, except telephone
  • Cable TV and internet access
  • Emergency call system
  • Additional storage available
  • Pet-friendly

Floor Plans: UHI_Oak_2b1.5bDen_1180_800P[1]

There are 184 senior residences, offering 44 different floor plans, including expansive three-bedroom penthouses.

Common Areas:

  • Lobby
  • 1st Floor Loft
  • Dining Room with Patio
  • Private Dining Room
  • Library
  • Game Room and Pool
  • Living Room
  • Gilman Auditorium [where my trumpet show was held]

Assisted Living’s Memory Fitness Program:

This innovative program is designed for residents with early to mid-stage memory loss. It offers a distinct set of specialized memory support services with structured full-day activities. Incorporating research results and community best-practices, this program enhances the daily experience and quality of life of residents with early to mid-stage Alzheimer’s or dementia. Some Memory Fitness activities include:

  • Memory engagement activities
  • Exercise group
  • Social activities
  • Cooking
  • Art and music
  • Travelogues
  • Famous biographies

Photos are courtesy of University House, Issaquah. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

Posted in Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Five Trumpet Pieces for the Mark R. Heglund (65) Funeral at Evergreen-Washelli in Seattle

Posted by glennled on March 2, 2019

Last week, the weather forecast for Thursday, 28 February, was for snow. Oh, no! I was booked to play three pieces at the funeral service of Mark Richard Heglund (65) at Evergreen-Washelli Funeral Home and Cemetery in north Seattle. One piece would be inside the chapel, and the other two would be outdoors. Thankfully, it turned out to be a sunny-bright day with a clear, deep-blue sky and a cool, calm 45 degrees. Perfect! IMG_2782

The program called for a trio to present “Pie Jesu” by Andrew Lloyd Webber—Laurie Geyer (soprano soloist), accompanied by Laurie McFarland (pianist) and me on my Getzen trumpet (see my blog post of 14 December 2015). Laurie sang in Latin, and the title, Pie Jesu (Pious Jesus) is usually translated, “O Sweet Jesus.” Here, He is asked for forgiveness, mercy, peace and rest.

Mark’s surviving sister, Helene (Heglund) Reed, chose the music. I was referred to her by the very professional funeral director, Ryan Rasmussen. She gave a moving eulogy for her older brother and presented a lovely video about him and their family. He was born on 15 May 1953 and died on 11 February 2019, after suffering during his last years from cancer and pneumonia. He was a successful commercial real estate agent, investor, developer, and landlord. He loved basketball, Seattle Supersonics, Golden State Warriors, demolition, Chinook’s Restaurant, University Presbyterian Church, family, friends, people, jokes, road trips, art history, antiques, trumpet, Herb Alpert, and Jesus. Mark was a gifted musician, playing drums and trumpet in the school band. In Boy Scouts, he loved “Reveille” and “Taps” and earned the “esteemed Eagle Scout rank.” A good man who lived a good life. While I’m no Herb Alpert, I am grateful to have been chosen to play Mark’s favorite instrument at his memorial service.

When the service ended and the pallbearers carried the casket to the coach waiting outside the chapel, I played “Amazing Grace.” At the grave site, I played the bugle call, “Funeral March,” as the pallbearers carried the casket to the grave. There, Laurie (Mark’s cousin), sang “The Lord’s Prayer.” At the close of the service, I played “Il Silenzio” (The Silence), a song written in 1965 by Italian trumpeter, Nini Rosso, which became a worldwide hit and is now a standard.

Finally, as the casket was lowered into the grave, I played “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.” One of the verses has been translated from the Latin thus:

O come, O Branch of Jesse’s tree,
free them from Satan’s tyranny
that trust thy mighty power to save,
and give them victory o’er the grave.

Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
shall come to you, O Israel.

Here are links to some worldwide favorite renditions of “Pie Jesu” and “Il Silenzio”:

Pie Jesu https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=K6RSB39DMfM

Il Silenzio:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmK-uaYFBJc

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: