Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

  • June 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    30  
  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 65 other followers

  • Subscribe

Posts Tagged ‘Super Olds’

St. Patrick’s Day Private Concert in Condo of an Irish Couple in Edmonds

Posted by glennled on May 7, 2019

54524338_10218355189773992_1274959671723032576_n[1]

L to R: DeeDee Kelly, Nancy MacDonald, and Robert E. Kelly

Sunday, the 17th of March, was St. Patrick’s Day, celebrating the life of the patron saint of Ireland who died during Lent on this date in 461 A.D. My wife’s cousin and her husband, DeeDee and Bob Kelly, in Edmonds are thoroughly Irish, so I offered to play a few Irish tunes for them in their own condominium. They chose five traditional Irish songs:

  • “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling”
  • “Danny Boy”
  • “Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral”
  • “Molly Malone”
  • “My Wild Irish Rose”

I played three instruments: my Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet, Super Olds cornet, and Jupiter pocket trumpet.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Musical Events at Home | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

St. Patrick’s Day Celebration—My Trumpet Show at University House, Issaquah

Posted by glennled on March 30, 2019

 

University-House-Issaquah

University House, Issaquah

On the 15th of March, two days before the actual St. Patrick’s Day, my one-hour trumpet show, “St. Patrick’s Day Celebration,” was listed on the calendar of University House, free-shamrock-clip-art-9BXAvf-clipart[1]Issaquah (UHI) as only one of seven events scheduled that day. Compared to many retirement homes, that’s a lot of activities for the residents to choose among when they ask in the morning, “What shall we do today?”

th5STAXPZ1So, at 3:00 p.m., about 50 of them showed up in Gilman Auditorium to hear me play 27 Irish tunes on my three horns and tell a dozen Irish jokes. Amber Duffy, Life Enrichment Director, had advertised the event thusly on the UHI Calendar: “St. Patrick’s Day Happy Hour with the Irish Trumpet.” And it was grand.

Among the ballads, jig, and reels that I played were many old favorite traditional songs, including “My Wild Irish Rose,” “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling,” “Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral,” “Molly Malone,” and “Danny Boy.” Others included “Chicken Reel,” “The Irish Washerwoman,” “St. Patrick’s Day,” “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” “Whiskey in the Jar,” “The Irish Rover,” and “The Rocky Road to Dublin.”

For most of them, I used my Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet; for several, I played my Super Olds cornet; and for one, the finale, I played my Jupiter pocket trumpet.

Here’s a sample joke:

The doctor was puzzled and said, “I’m very sorry, Mr. O’Flaherty, but I can’t diagnose your trouble. I think it must be the—alcohol.”
“Don’t worry about it, Dr. Cullen, I know how you feel. I’ll come back when you’re sober.”

When the show ended, I handed out a sheet containing 22 good, clean Irish jokes, encouraging the residents to have some fun on the phone, the internet, or in person with their grandchildren and others during the festive weekend.

University House, Issaquah

UHI is one of eight Era Living Retirement Communities (please see https://www.eraliving.com/communities/issaquah/). It offers senior independent living CaringStar2019[1] and assisted living care, but it is not an average senior living community. It has unique partnerships with the University of Washington’s Schools of Nursing, Social Work and Pharmacy and the UW Retirement Association in order to deliver innovative programs designed to foster healthy living.

It appeals to residents who “share a passion for knowledge, a fascination with art and culture, and the desire to stay active in mind, body, and spirit.” The community has “a distinct academic flavor where residents enjoy a connection to UW programs and a commitment to lifelong learning.”

Amenities:

  • Elegant restaurant, flexible dining options, variety of cuisines, in-house chef
  • Vibrant Life Enrichment programs [such as my trumpet show]
  • Reception
  • On-site Wellness Center, nurse, caregivers
  • Emergency call and daily check-in system
  • Maintenance services
  • Weekly housekeeping and linen services
  • Personal and group transportation services
  • Swimming pool
  • Fitness center featuring EnhanceFitness classes
  • Full-service, on-site salon*
  • Two solariums
  • Garden courtyards
  • Game and crafts room
  • Library
  • Internet Cafe
  • Professionally curated art collections
  • Auditorium for large gatherings and events [such as my trumpet show]
  • Resident parking*
  • *Additional fee

Residence Features:

  • Full kitchens
  • Easy-access shower, bathing benches, grab bars
  • Individually controlled heating
  • Ceiling fans
  • All utilities included, except telephone
  • Cable TV and internet access
  • Emergency call system
  • Additional storage available
  • Pet-friendly

Floor Plans: UHI_Oak_2b1.5bDen_1180_800P[1]

There are 184 senior residences, offering 44 different floor plans, including expansive three-bedroom penthouses.

Common Areas:

  • Lobby
  • 1st Floor Loft
  • Dining Room with Patio
  • Private Dining Room
  • Library
  • Game Room and Pool
  • Living Room
  • Gilman Auditorium [where my trumpet show was held]

Assisted Living’s Memory Fitness Program:

This innovative program is designed for residents with early to mid-stage memory loss. It offers a distinct set of specialized memory support services with structured full-day activities. Incorporating research results and community best-practices, this program enhances the daily experience and quality of life of residents with early to mid-stage Alzheimer’s or dementia. Some Memory Fitness activities include:

  • Memory engagement activities
  • Exercise group
  • Social activities
  • Cooking
  • Art and music
  • Travelogues
  • Famous biographies

Photos are courtesy of University House, Issaquah. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

Posted in Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

My 45th Student Is Only 70 Years Old

Posted by glennled on February 2, 2019

IMG_2674

Olds Ambassador cornet in its original case with 1962 Indiana state trumpet competition medal pinned inside the lid (left)

Why does the above headline read, “only 70 years old”? Well, because my student #26 was an 81-year old retired engineer (see my blog post of 18 February 2016), and my student #38 was a 76-year old retired Army veteran (see my blog post of 17 November 2017). The 81-year old played a Kanstul cornet, and the veteran played a Getzen bugle. My new student (#45) plays an Olds Ambassador cornet, and as you may remember, I still play a Super Olds cornet given to me by my parents when I entered high school in 1954.

IMG_2667 (2)

Olds Ambassador cornet, c. 1961

On 27 December 2018, I had my first private lesson with Victor Snyder at his home in the Bryant neighborhood in Seattle, east of the University of Washington. In fact, in 2015, he retired from UW, where after 20 years of employment, he was the Associate Director, Career Counseling Center [now, Career and Internship Center]. Now that he’s retired, he wants to play cornet again.

The first time Vic played his cornet was when he was a 7th and 8th grade student at St. Pius Catholic School in Tell City, Indiana. In 1962, while in the 8th grade, he won a state solo competition, was graded “superior,” and was awarded a medal by the Indiana School Music Association. He performed “The Pals” polka by George D. Barnard (see photo). The next year, as a freshman, he started taking band at Tell City High School but then dropped it. Nevertheless, his mother saved his cornet and his music, thinking that since he was talented, he might someday take it up again. I’m sure that would make her happy and proud again.

IMG_2666

“The Pals” polka by George D. Barnard can be played as either a solo or duet with piano accompaniment

After high school, Vic earned a Bachelors degree at Kent State University in Ohio, served a tour in the U.S. Navy including being stationed on Whidbey Island in Washington, and then earned a Masters degree at the University of Washington in 1976.  The next time he played his cornet was in 1989, twenty-seven years after winning that medal. He took private lessons for about half a year. The tutor assigned him only exercises in Arbans Complete Conservatory Method: Trumpet, but he wanted to play songs, too. As everyone knows, Arbans is a wonderful instruction book and even contains many old songs, but it is designed for advanced students, not beginners or re-starters. He became bored and frustrated and stopped the lessons.

Now, Vic is taking up the horn once again, simply for his own pleasure. Eventually, he might join a combo with a friend and/or play with a community band and such—or not. He’s really doing this to please himself. He found me through http://www.takelessons.com. His weekly lessons are one-hour long, and he often practices twice a day. He’s working his way through two exercise books that are more appropriate for his current performance level:

  • Rubank Elementary Level, Cornet or Trumpet by A. F. Robinson.
  • Progressive Beginner Trumpet by Peter Gelling.

The skills are coming back, but in addition, Vic is learning much more than he ever did. He knows that I host an annual recital in my home in late May or early June. Perhaps by then, he will be able to play “The Pals” again, but if he wants to play something else, we’ll find the right thing. I’m betting that his mom, who passed away in 2005, would be proud to hear him once more—after all, he’s only 70 and has many more miles yet to go.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

Posted in New Students - Intro Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

“Things Remembered”—My 1-Hour Trumpet Show on the First Day of Advent at Overlake Terrace Retirement Community in Redmond

Posted by glennled on December 23, 2018

IMG_2372

My Christmas trumpet show is called “Things Remembered” because, by using some old favorite songs, I walk the audience through the common pattern of life that we all share—living single, falling in love, getting married, raising a family, celebrating Christmas year after year, laughing at jokes, overcoming adversity, facing retirement, and celebrating the fantastic blessings of life in America during our wonderful time in human history. On 1 December, the first day of Advent this year, I performed this show for an audience of 25-30 residents and staff at Overlake Terrace Retirement Community in Redmond.2017-assisted-living-award-sm

20181201_132322The show consists of 24 songs, half from musicals and movies and half about Christmas. All are favorites of the age group living today in retirement communities. They sing along as I play. And as they listen to me play and talk, they recall where they were and what was happening when they first heard and learned those songs—“Things Remembered.”

2018-assisted-living-awardFor variety and fun, as appropriate for each song, I play three instruments (two trumpets and one cornet) and use four mouthpieces and one mute. One mouthpiece makes my Super Olds cornet sound like a flugelhorn, so in effect, it’s like playing four different instruments for them.

Overlake Terrace provides independent, assisted living, memory care, and respite services. For more information, here is the link to the website:  https://www.stellarliving.com/overlake-terrace/. And for a tour of the interior of the facilities, please see the photo gallery here: https://www.stellarliving.com/overlake-terrace/photo-tour/. The 14 photos show the main lobby entrance, café, and dining room; model bedroom and living room; family rooms, library, exercise room, activity room, and movie theater.

Overlake Terrace is part of Stellar Senior Living, based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The group consists of 8 retirement communities, including two in Washington (Redmond and Kent), two in Utah, two in Idaho, and one each in Colorado and Arizona.

The photos below are courtesy of Overlake Terrace. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

“Showtune Favorites” Trumpet Show at Chateau Pacific Retirement Community in Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on April 18, 2018

IMG_4964 (2)

Glenn Ledbetter’s “Showtune Favorites” trumpet show, Chateau Pacific Retirement Community, Lynnwood

Trumpet shows at retirement communities are unusual. More often, the residents are treated to piano, guitar, or flute music and singers. But after I performed a one-hour show entitled “Showtune Favorites: Hit Songs from Musicals and Movies” on 29 March for an audience of about 40+ in the Fireside Lounge at Chateau Pacific in Lynnwood, Andrea Uchytil, the Life Enrichment Director, said to me, “We want you back soon!”

IMG_4954

Andrea Uchytil, Life Enhancement Director, Chateau Pacific Retirement Community

Before the show, she had warned me, “People come and go during these shows.” But there was very little of that. People hummed and sang along to songs from The Sound of Music, Porgy and Bess, Casablanca, South Pacific, My Fair Lady, The Music Man, Fiddler on the Roof, Hello Dolly, and more. And they chuckled or groaned at my jokes. I performed at Happy Hour (3:30 p.m.), and indeed, it was a happy time for all of us.

I used three horns, two mutes, and three mouthpieces during the show: my Super Olds cornet (1954), Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet (c. 1977), and Jupiter JPT-416 Pocket Trumpet (2000). IMG_4983

Meanwhile, I enjoyed learning about Chateau Pacific Retirement Community (see http://www.chateau-pacific.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/Chateau-Retirement-144233238701/ ). It is located near the intersection of State Highways 99 and 525 in north Lynnwood.

Chateau Pacific was built in 2000, and is 4 stories high. The community has the capacity of 147 apartments, including the Memory Care units which can accommodate 24 residents. The Independent and Assisted Living units are integrated throughout the whole community. Units for Respite Care are not available on a regular basis.

There are five basic floor plans. Counting the variations of those plans, there are actually 15 different layouts, as shown on the website:

IMG_4934

Chateau Pacific Retirement Community, Lynnwood

  • Studio, 1 Bth – from 294 to 431 sq.ft.
  • 1 Bdrm, 1 Bth – from 457 to 738 sq.ft.
  • 2 Bdrm, 1 Bth – from 821 to 834 sq.ft.
  • 2 Bdrm, 2 Bth – from 854 to 895 sq.ft.

The Photo Gallery at http://www.chateau-pacific.com/senior-living/wa/lynnwood/photo-gallery contains 20 photos, showing the rooms, common areas including indoor pool and fitness room, garden, patio, fireside lounge area, game room, and library reading room.

Photos by Brian Seguin, Gary Walderman, and Chateau Pacific. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

My New Jupiter Pocket Trumpet

Posted by glennled on March 31, 2018

 

IMG_4908

Jupiter Pocket Trumpet JPT-416

We’ve been travelling more than ever in the past few years, and each time we return, it takes me awhile to regain my embouchure strength, stamina, power, and slotting control. For years, I would take along my mouthpiece and/or my P.E.T.E. (Personal Embouchure Training Exerciser—please see http://www.warburton-usa.com/index.php/pete).  My intent was to maintain as much embouchure fitness as I could while away, but I missed the many benefits (such as eye-to-hand coordination) of actually playing. A pocket trumpet is specifically designed to fix this problem. I’ve wanted one for a long time.

IMG_0599 (2)

L to R: Getzen Eterna Severinsen model 900S, made in c.1977; Jupiter Pocket Trumpet, JPT-416, made in 2000; and Super Olds Cornet, made in 1954 and given to me by my parents as I became a freshman in high school band

Then recently, an excellent trumpeter in Edmonds posted on Facebook a picture of herself playing her pocket trumpet while on a cruise. Enviously, I commented that I want to buy one for myself. Well, in late February, she contacted me and said she was going to sell it—would I be interested in buying? We set an appointment for a tryout. In short, I liked it very much and bought it on 7 March.

It’s a Jupiter model JPT-416. She inherited it when her Dad passed away in 2016. He was a trumpeter also and often sounded “Taps” at Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent, Washington. She said he purchased it new in 2000, so I am now the third owner. It came with a case and a Bach 1-1/2C mouthpiece. I’m thrilled! It’s in beautiful condition and plays so well. Of course, this model has now been superseded. What is the MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price) for the current model, JTR-710? Jupiter informs me that in 2017, it was $1,159.

Before this, I had played only one pocket trumpet, and it gave me fits. I had a great deal of trouble with slotting. I splattered notes all over the place. My embouchure settings from playing my Super Olds cornet and Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet simply did not translate to that pocket trumpet. Also, I’d always been warned that many pocket trumpets play out of tune and produce poor tonal quality. So I was concerned.

But I had no such troubles playing this Jupiter. It played easy, open and free, with a solid sound in all registers. My slotting was right on. I used a tuner to check whether the intonation was erratic—I found that it had no more variability than a good quality trumpet. Its clear lacquer finish was impeccable. So I bought it right then and there.

You can bet that on our next trip, it’s going into my suitcase (along with my practice mute)!

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

Posted in trumpets | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

My “Things Remembered” Show at SHAG Retirement Community in Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on December 20, 2017

 

IMG_4632

Glenn Ledbetter (background) plays trumpet and cornet in his one-hour show, “Things Remembered,” for SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center Senior Living residents

 

Last Saturday afternoon, 15 December 2017, about 45 people in a retirement community whom I’d never met came to hear me play trumpet. I had promised to perform a one-hour show for them, playing a mixture of 25 songs—12 Christmas songs and 13 songs from classic musicals and movies. I entitled my show “Things Remembered.”

I chose songs to induce them to remember different times and stages in their own lives. Here are some examples. One of the most beautiful songs ever written, “Over the Rainbow,” expresses our universal hopes and dreams about finding happiness and IMG_4631success, and “I’ve Got the World on a String” expresses our achievements of the same. But then, “Stormy Weather” expresses our feelings of failure and depression, while “Make Someone Happy” answers the question of how to make those Over-the-Rainbow dreams come true—love. For caring for babies, those helpless, totally dependent creatures we conceived, “Summertime” says it best.

The Christmas songs I played were to entice us to remember being a kid and later, having kids and grandkids. They tell us of the birth of our Savior. They renew our spirit, they spark new hopes and plans and joy and peace. My elderly audience sang the words from memory.

IMG_4641For thinking about retirement, I chose “When I’m Sixty-Four.” For feeling gratitude, I played “God Bless America.” For summing up our lives, I played the lovely, precious “What a Wonderful World,” and then finished with this earnest farewell, “Have Yourself a Very Merry Christmas.”

Amongst the songs, I worked in a dozen jokes that I have shared this year with my 12-year old granddaughter, who last Christmas gave me a whole book of jokes. And I offered a handout to the audience—a list of 50 jokes and riddles from that same book, so that they could share them with their own grandchildren. All 30 copies disappeared.

I played both my Getzen trumpet (Doc Severinsen model) and Super Olds cornet (63 years old). Sometimes I used a Harmon mute, as in “Santa Baby.” When I use a deep-cup mouthpiece with the cornet, it sounds like a flugelhorn. I tried to make my horns sing the lyrics of those lovely songs. IMG_4599

Their kind gifts totaled $20, which I then donated to VFW Post 1040, Lynnwood, where I am the Post Bugler.

 

SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center Senior Living

Senior Housing Assistance Group (SHAG) is a non-profit organization formed in 1988 and is the largest provider of affordable senior apartment homes in Washington State. SHAG offers some units at market rates with no tenant-income restrictions, and others which are for tenants living on limited incomes. In compliance with state and federal laws, SHAG gladly accepts Section 8d and VASH (Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing) certificates and vouchers.

SHAG  communities serve more than 5,000 active, independent seniors in 25+ locations in the Puget Sound region, from Bellingham to Olympia, including eight locations in Seattle. These locations are near public transit hubs, retail shopping and public services.

All SHAG senior living communities have income and/or age restrictions that residents must meet in order to qualify for an apartment. The Lynnwood City Center Senior Living community serves seniors of all income levels who are 61 or older by the end of the IMG_4649 current year or 55 or older and disabled. The minimum lease term is 6 months, if available, but leases are generally for 12 months. The units are 1- and 2-bedroom size. Certain units have washer/dryer hookups and reserved garage parking. However, you need not own a car to live here. If you qualify, you can join SHAG’s Nissan Leaf Program and drive a so-called “company car.” Many SHAG residents contract with in-home care providers for housekeeping and medical help.

Amenities at Lynnwood City Center include courtyards, a rooftop deck, fully equipped fitness center, social room and TV lounge, craft and game room, business center, pea patch, rooftop dog run, free Wi-Fi in common areas, and social activities. Small pets, such as cats or dogs weighing 25 lbs. or less, are welcome. There is a two-pet maximum per household, and a $100 fee per pet is due at move-in. All pets are subject to approval.

You can reach SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center at www.shaglynnwood.com and 425-201-5284. For SHAG itself, the website is http://www.housing4seniors.com, telephone 1-844-592-SHAG (7424).

Photos are courtesy of SHAG’s Lynnwood City Center. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Shows at Retirement Homes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

2015 Wreaths Across America–“Never Forget”

Posted by glennled on February 5, 2016

244 copy RS

“Never Forget”

On this same day at this same hour of every year, the same ceremony is conducted in more than 900 locations across America and around the world—wreaths are placed on graves in military cemeteries on the second Saturday of December. It is called Wreaths Across America (WAA) and is an outgrowth of the Arlington Wreath Project, started in 1992. As the popular ceremony spread across the country, WAA was formed in 2007.

Here in Seattle, the theme of the 6th annual ceremony was “Never Forget.” Michael G. Reagan, famed artist of the “Fallen Heroes Project,” was the Keynote Speaker. Reagan was awarded the Citizen Service Before Self Honor (known to some as The Civilian Medal of Honor) on 25 March 2015 by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation in Arlington, VA.

The local ceremony was held at Veterans’ Memorial Cemetery, Evergreen-Washelli, on 12 December. Six military Medal of Honor recipients are buried there. The Navy Wives Club of America (NWCA), Totem 277, led by Donna Turner and Crystal Wilkerson, started hosting this event in 2010. Lorraine Zimmerman is the club’s WAA project leader and site coordinator for Everygreen-Washelli. Totem 277’s territory is from Seattle to Burlington.The primary element of the annual ceremony is the ceremonial wreath dedication by representatives of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard, Merchant Marines, and POW/MIAs.

290

“Never Forget”–William W. Wilson, former POW, places flag on wreath, followed by hand salute. Photo by Jacque Hodgen.

Zimmerman introduced the POW/MIA representative with these moving words: “William (Bill) W. Wilson, former Prisoner of the Vietnam War, made 33 missions over NVN and Laos, flying an F-111 before being shot down while bombing the Red River docks in downtown Hanoi on 22 December 1972. He evaded capture for a week, was nearly rescued by a Super Jolly Green helicopter, and then was captured by the North Vietnamese on 29 December. He spent a month in the ‘Heartbreak” section of the ‘Hanoi Hilton’ before being moved to the ‘Zoo.’ He returned to U.S. control on the last C-141A out of Hanoi on 29 March 1973 during Operation Homecoming. Bill will now place a flag [on the POW/MIA wreath] in honor of the more than 83,000 United States Servicemen from all branches of the service whose last known status was either Prisoner of War or Missing in Action. These individuals have never returned to their families and homes. We will not forget you.”

Among the many voluntary participants was the VFW Post 1040 Honor Guard. As Post Bugler,  I played “Assembly” on my Super Olds cornet at 9 a.m. as Zimmerman issued the Call to Order and the 62nd Airlift Wing Air Force Honor Guard presented the colors. To close the ceremony, the VFW Post 1040 Honor Guard fired a perfect rifle salute, and I sounded “Taps.” Afterwards, participants and audience members placed wreaths on numerous tombstones in the cemetery.

For more information, please see:

One photo below is by Geoffrey T. Lewis. All others are by Jacque Hodgen. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

High School Band Day at Husky Stadium—UW vs. Idaho State

Posted by glennled on May 27, 2014

IMG_9285

UW Director of Athletic Bands, Dr. Brad McDavid

On 21 September 2013, the University of Washington Husky Marching Band, under the direction of Dr. Brad McDavid, hosted its annual “Band Day.”  In 2013, the Husky Marching Band, created in 1929, commenced its 84th season.

Selected high school bands from all over the state performed in the second home football game held in the newly renovated Husky Stadium in Seattle. The Huskies beat the Bengals of Idaho State University, 56-0, and as a member of the Husky Alumni Band, I got to play my 59-year old Super Olds cornet again. I’m of the UW Class of 1962.

The photos below were taken by Louis Figueroa (ground level) and Garry Nakayama (press box level). Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

 

 

Posted in HMBAA - Husky Alumni Band | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

“Mele Kalikimaka” Honors Lost Family Matriarch on Christmas Eve at Home

Posted by glennled on January 12, 2013

Glenn Ledbetter plays "Mele Kalikimaka" on his Super Olds Cornet (1954)

Glenn Ledbetter plays “Mele Kalikimaka” on his Super Olds Cornet (1954)

Our family tradition on Christmas Eve includes singing Christmas carols after dinner and before opening gifts. My wife plays piano as we sing, and a few years ago, we added a couple of trumpet solos to the program. This year, I played “Mele Kalikimaka” because on all our minds was the recent loss of my wife’s mother, Ruth, who died peacefully on 12 October. This was our first Christmas without her.

To Ruth, Hawaii was paradise. She and her husband, Mac, first went to Waikiki to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary. They always returned annually until he passed away, and then she continued to go back. In all, she vacationed there for 39 straight years! She was a bright spirit, and we miss her so much.

“Mele Kalikimaka” means “Merry Christmas,” and Robert Alex Anderson wrote the song in 1949. Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters recorded the song in 1950 on Decca 27228 (78 rpm)/9-27228 (45 rmp). To hear their recording, please see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJhYrC8Rq8w.

For my second trumpet solo, I played “Angels We Have Heard on High,” a traditional French carol.

Posted in Musical Events at Home | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

 
%d bloggers like this: