Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

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Posts Tagged ‘band’

Fall Band and Orchestra Concert at Meadowdale High School in Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on October 31, 2019

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Wind Ensemble, Meadowdale High School, Lynnwood, Emily Hurd, Conductor, 10-30-2019

It was a full house in the Great Hall of Meadowdale High School (MHS) in Lynnwood on 30 October to hear the concert by six groups of musicians—Percussion Ensemble, Concert Orchestra, Symphonic Band, Symphony Strings, Wind Ensemble, and Chamber Orchestra. All told, they performed 15 pieces.

Why would I attend? Not because I might have a private trumpet student who was playing in one of the two bands—I don’t. Not because MHS is in the Edmonds School District and I live in Edmonds—that wouldn’t do it. Nope—I gladly went because my precious granddaughter plays in one of the groups—that’s it!

Nathan Rengstorf is the director of the three orchestras, while Emily Hurd is director of the Percussion Ensemble, Symphonic Band, and Wind Ensemble. I particularly enjoyed “Technology,” “Wood Splitter Fanfare,” “The Irish Baker,” “Waltz of the Wicked,” “Puszta Mvt. 1,” and “Incantations.”

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Percussion Ensemble and Concert Orchestra

Symphonic Band

 

Wind Ensemble

 

 

 

 

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Fall Cleaning of My Four Horns—Now I’m Ready!

Posted by glennled on September 11, 2019

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Four trumpets, all completely disassembled and ready to clean. Upper left: Getzen Eterna trumpet, Super Olds cornet, and Jupiter pocket trumpet. Upper right: Getzen field trumpet (bugle). Lower left: all the slides from the three horns above. Lower right: Nine valves and 11 mouthpieces (including one trombone).

 

I’m switching from petroleum-based valve oil to synthetic, so I want to take no chances on possible incompatibility. If the two brands don’t mix, they can cause the valves to stick badly—almost freeze. So I wanted to rid my horns of all traces of the petroleum oil before I applied the synthetic.

On 25 August, I took over the kitchen for a few hours. And as long as I was going to clean my three horns with valves, why not clean the bugle, too? These are the four:

  • Getzen Eterna Trumpet, Doc Severinsen Model (c.1977)
  • Super Olds Cornet (1954)
  • Jupiter Pocket Trumpet (2000)
  • Getzen Field Trumpet [bugle] (2015)

It’s fall. Had to get my horns ready. In September, UW football games began, and I’m in the Husky Alumni Band. We play at home games. Also, the orchestra at Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood resumes performances at certain Sunday services and begins preparations for the annual Christmas musical in December. I’ve played in this orchestra since 2010. Sometime in September, I’d like to busk at Veterans Plaza in Edmonds one more time before this year’s nearby Saturday Market shuts down until next May. I do it to fundraise for the VFW. In October, I begin my 9th year teaching beginning brass at Skyview Middle School in Bothell. And meanwhile, I’m booked to play one-hour trumpet shows at some retirement homes this fall. It’s all very fun.

My horns are now ready. I’m ready. Needless to say, I admire and love my horns. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in trumpets | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

My Blogging Spree—23 Recent Posts!

Posted by glennled on July 25, 2019

Whew! I’ve posted 23 articles here on my blog during the past 11 weeks. For me, that’s a lot—in 11 years of blogging (see Archives column to the left), I’ve never had such an intense, prolific period. At last, I’m caught up to date (pant, pant). The backlog has been fulfilled, the warehouse is finally empty. As I look back at it, I see the following breakdown of these 23 blog posts: Thinking_of_music_color - by Pacific Retirement Services, Inc.

  • Burial-at-Sea, Puget Sound (1)
  • Trumpet shows at retirement communities in Seattle (Wallingford, Broadview twice, and First Hill neighborhoods), Mercer Island, Edmonds, Lynnwood (7)
  • Church orchestra concert, Lynnwood (1)
  • School band concerts involving my students, Bothell (1)
  • New trumpet students for private lessons, Mercer Island, Kirkland, Bothell (3)
  • Summer jazz band camp involving one of my students, Bellevue (1)
  • Recitals, Seattle, Edmonds (2)
  • Moon Walk, 50th anniversary ceremony, Edmonds (1)—(this post also mentions a cemetery memorial and busking to fundraise for VFW on the same day)
  • National holiday and observant day ceremonies (Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day), Lynnwood twice, Mercer Island twice, Edmonds (5)
  • This summary article (1)

Such is my blog. Experiencing these diverse events enables me to reflect about anything—not only music, theory, genres, concerts, shows, ceremonies, camps, bands, orchestras, ensembles, trumpets and cornets, equipment accessories, exercises, techniques, compositions, talent, and such, but also youth, aging, family, patriotism, spirituality, beauty, death, public (including military) service, sacrifice, discipline, teaching, travel, holidays, goals, achievements, gifts, life lessons, sports, recreation, entertainment, laughter, fun, gratitude—you name it, whatever comes up. After all, music is the universal language. And there’s more to come. Bring it on. It’s a Good Life!

Posted in Status, Milestones, Summaries | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Music at 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing Ceremony at Neil Armstrong Plaza in Edmonds

Posted by glennled on July 24, 2019

 

LtoR-Hoggins, Vogel, Earling, Clark

L to R: Dale Hoggins, Larry Vogel, Mayor Dave Earling, and Dennis Clark. Vogel holds his copy of The New York Times from 50 years ago. Clark, while a high school student, spearheaded the idea of honoring Neil Armstrong with a monument in Edmonds. Hoggins, former Edmonds School District principal, once coached Clark in Little League baseball. Mayor Earling officially re-dedicated the monument. Photo by Julia Wiese, My Edmonds News.

 

20 July 2019 minus 20 July 1969 = 50 years. And that’s how long it’s been since Neil Armstrong and Edwin (“Buzz”) Aldrin walked on the moon. The whole nation, the whole world is remembering this most amazing event in human history.

In Edmonds, the occasion sparked the creation, dedication, and re-dedication of the Apollo 11 Monument which now sits downtown in the Neil Armstrong Plaza. Never heard of it? Nor had I, but after last Saturday, I’ll never forget it. I found it at the north end of the Edmonds Police Station, just off 5th Street. There, I provided the music for the re-dedication ceremony at 9 a.m. on 20 July—two bugle calls on my Getzen bugle and three songs on my Getzen trumpet:

Apollo 11 Monument, Edmonds, by Feliks Banel

The gray Apollo 11 Monument in Neil Armstrong Plaza, Edmonds, turned golden at sunset. Photo by Feliks Banel.

  • “Assembly”
  • “To the Color”
  • “Anchors Aweigh” (for Neil Armstrong, Naval Aviator and test pilot)
  • “Wild Blue Yonder” (for Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr., Air Force fighter pilot, Korean War, and Michael Collins, Air Force test pilot and author)
  • “America the Beautiful”
tn_Apollo_11_Crew - Photo courtesdy of NASA.

Apollo 11 Crew (L to R): Armstrong, Aldrin, Collins. NASA photo.

About 40 people attended. Felix Banel, noted Northwest historian and KIRO-FM radio personality, emceed the re-dedication event. Historian Larry Vogel, the keynote speaker, told of how, in his boyhood, he was caught up in the space race with the Soviet Union in the late 1950s through the 1960s. After the moon walk, “I ran out the next morning as soon as the newspapers hit the stands [on Long Island, his home] and picked up a copy of The New York Times—I knew it would be historic. For the first time, the staid Times ran a headline in the largest type they had ever used—‘Men Walk on Moon.’ I’ve kept it safely at the bottom on my sock drawer ever since!”

Mayor Dave Earling reflected on the moon walk and then read the proclamation, re-dedicating the monument. He promised to upgrade the plaza and make it more well-known. Afterwards, I learned that he is a former trumpet player and was a music teacher and the Band Director, Shoreline Community College, 1967-1978. Then he became real estate broker, manager, and owner of Edmonds Realty for 25 years. He lives in Perrinville, where I live also. He owns 5 trumpets, and his favorite is a King.

After the ceremony concluded, I went, as part of the VFW Post 1040 Honor Guard, to Edmonds Cemetery for a memorial service. There I sounded “Taps” immediately after the rifle team rendered the three-volley rifle salute for the deceased Navy veteran.

And from there, I went to busk at the Veterans Plaza next to the Edmonds Saturday Market in downtown Edmonds. I played songs for an hour and a half—I do this two-to-four times a summer to fundraise. All donations are split between VFW Post 1040, Lynnwood, and VFW Post 8870, Edmonds. So far this summer, having busked three times, I’ve raised $140, donated by the generous people who attend the market and come to the adjacent plaza to sit and listen to the trumpet. I’m a lucky man. Please see my posts of 7 July and 11 October 2017, using the Archives in the left column.

Plaque on monument (3)

Plaque on Apollo 11 Monument, Edmonds. Photo courtesy of Larry Vogel.

 

Apollo 11 and the Monument

The Apollo 11 monument was designed to resemble a space capsule by local sculptor and Edmonds Community College art teacher, Howard Duell. Made of concrete and brass, it stands more than 11 feet high and weighs about 3,800 pounds. On the front is depicted Armstrong’s moon walk with the American flag planted in the lunar surface in 1969. On the back is the Saturn V rocket on its launch pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the moon rising behind, as the Apollo 11 mission prepares for launch.

It was originally dedicated on 4 July 1976, our nation’s bicentennial date. Washington Gov. Dan Evans issued a declaration naming the occasion as “Neil Armstrong Plaza Day.” Larry Vogel wrote, “the crowd gathered, the ribbon was cut, and the monument dedicated just in time for the start of the Fourth of July parade.”

Michael Collins was the third member of the Apollo 11 crew. He remained in orbit around the moon inside the Columbia space capsule while Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the moon, exploring the area and gathering moon rocks for analysis.

My Edmonds News recently published two articles about the original dedication of the monument and the re-dedication ceremonies, and Feliks Banel posted another:

Photos are courtesy of My Edmonds News, Julia Wiese, photographer, unless otherwise credited. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

My Student Performs in “Cracking the Jazz Code” Concert in Bellevue

Posted by glennled on July 23, 2019

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At “Crack the Jazz Code” band camp, Music Works Northwest, Bellevue

 

My 8th-grade trumpet student from Mercer Island has played in six recitals—one with a piano accompanist—but needed to get some ensemble experience to prepare him for joining a band when he gets to high school. You see, there is no band program at St. Monica’s Catholic School, where he is now a student. So, his parents enrolled him in a one-week jazz band camp held at Music Works Northwest in Bellevue. The camp is for ages 11-15 (middle and high school) at the level of two years of school band or orchestra.

The “Crack the Jazz Code” camp culminated in a concert on Friday afternoon, 19 July. The camp director, Christian Pincock, trombonist, led the 15-member group in a program of six pieces:

  • “Flip Top” by Ted Curson, trumpeter
  • “Cantaloupe Island” by Herbie Hancock, pianist
  • “Cute” by Count Basie, pianist
  • “Comparsa” by Candido Camero, percussionist (bongos and conga drums)
  • “Watermelon Man” by Herbie Hancock, pianist
  • “C-Jam Blues” by Duke Ellington, pianist

At the concert, the brass section was comprised of 7 trumpeters and two trombonists.

Music Works Northwest offers two dozen summer camps. For more information, please see http://www.musicworksnw.org/ and http://www.christianpincock.net. For previous posts about my trumpet student, please see my blog posts of 10 May 2019, 21 May 2018, and 18 November 2017. This was his first experience playing jazz in an ensemble.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Seminars, Lectures & Workshops | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

My 49th Trumpet Student Aims for Juanita High School Jazz Band, Kirkland

Posted by glennled on July 18, 2019

My 49th trumpet student found me online and signed up for 10 one-hour lessons. We started with the first one on 3 July. His immediate goal is to make the jazz band at Juanita High School (JHS) in Kirkland, where, at age 14, he will be a freshman in September. I’m all in—let’s go for it!

1[1] (2)What experience does he have? It’s good that there’re some musicianship in his family. His mother played flute and piccolo, and his older brother, a junior at JHS, plays saxophone. He started band classes in fourth grade at Thoreau Elementary School. When he got to Finn Hill Middle School, he joined the jazz band and played there for three years. Last year, he and another trumpeter usually took the solos. Also, he’s a Boy Scout bugler.

Where to start? I listened to him play. He has excellent range—above high C. His tone is solid but meek. His articulation is accurate. Naturally, he has some weaknesses and bad habits—who doesn’t, especially at his age? That’s why he’s taking lessons! But his attitude is good, and his spirit is pleasant and positive. He has ambition and loves trumpet. He wants to earn the Boy Scout’s Bugling Merit Badge. He fits my tutoring motto—“Become Your Best!”

Next, we considered his equipment. He rents a student-level trumpet and, in time, plans to move up to an intermediate horn. He has a few mouthpieces; we identified the one that gives him the highest range. Later, after school starts, we will identify the one that is the most versatile, responsive and comfortable in the range where he’ll be playing most often.

Third, I asked him what improvements he could make that would enhance his chances of being selected for jazz band. His answer: “dynamics.” To me, that says he wants to improve his technique so that his sound will be more expressive of feelings. In other words, he wants to be able to make the horn “cry and sing and inspire.” Won’t that be fun to teach!

So—I asked his mom to buy three books:

 

  • Mel Bay’s Complete Jazz Trumpet Book by William Bay, published by Mel Bay Publications, Inc.
  • 101 Jazz Songs: Trumpet by Hal Leonard Corporation
  • 67 Bugle Calls by Carl Fischer, New Edition

Next week, we’ll have our fourth one-hour lesson. School classes start in less than six weeks on Tuesday, 3 September. Here we go!

Incidentally, he is not my first trumpet student at JHS. Two others are featured in my blog post of 4 June 2013, which contains photos of the JHS Concert Band, Symphonic Band, and Jazz Band at that time. To read about today’s band program at JHS, under the direction of Annemarie Smith, please see https://jhs.lwsd.org/activitiesathletics/performing-arts/band.

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My #48 Trumpet Student Plays Catch-Up This Summer as She Enters Mercer Island High School

Posted by glennled on July 12, 2019

At our first private trumpet lesson on 27 June, I learned from my 48th student that she has plans to join the Mercer Island High School Band (MIHS) as a freshman this fall. She took band and played trumpet in 5th grade but then quit. Now, she misses it and wants MIHSBand[1]to be back in it among friends. They, however, have three more years of experience than she does! Plus, she’s forgotten much of what she had learned. It’s a steep game of Catch-Up!

But she has some things now that she didn’t have in 5th grade—more maturity, motivation, and willingness to practice. Her Mom is realistic about it: she knows her daughter will need to continue private lessons throughout the school year. It’s a steep learning curve to catch up to your peers after a long layoff.th[7]

But if you like playing music, who wouldn’t want to be in the MIHS Band? It’s outstanding. I know—I lived on M.I. for 34 years, and my older son was a drummer in that band. He continues to play now in a group where he lives in New Zealand.

According to the MIHS website, “Currently, almost one of every four MIHS students is enrolled in the band program,” led by Directors Parker Bixby, Ryan Lane, David Bentley, and Carol Krell. There are more than 300 students in the band program.

The MI concert band program is comprised of four bands:

  • Concert Band—freshmen band students.
  • Symphonic Band—over 80 sophomore and junior members (auditioned).
  • Wind Symphony—over 70 sophomores, juniors, and seniors (auditioned).
  • Wind Ensemble—55 members (the premier performing ensemble at MIHS).

In addition, there is the MI marching band which performs during football season. Comprised of more than 280 members, it is one of the largest in the state. It performed in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, CA in 1993, 2006, 2013, and 2019.

Besides all this, there are jazz bands and steel drum bands at MIHS. During basketball season the Animal Band takes over. It’s really four bands, formed by splitting the 280-member marching band into four groups. At games, they’re very loud and very enthusiastic animals.

The musicianship level at MIHS is very high. Last school year, 18 band students were selected to the Washington All-State and All-Northwest Bands. The students selected for the All-Northwest group were from Washington, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Wyoming, and Alaska. During the past five years, more than 50 students made All-State and All-Northwest. Four students have been selected to the National Wind Ensemble. The band has performed at Seattle Seahawks football games and at the 2009 Major League Soccer (MLS) Cup match. In 2008, the band completed a successful 10-day cultural and musical exchange in China.

For a full description of MIHS Bands, please see https://www.mercerislandschools.org/Page/5453

For numerous videos of MIHS bands, please see: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=mercer+island+band+boosters+videos&qpvt=mercer+island+band+boosters+videos&FORM=VQFRML

Posted in New Students - Intro Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Fifth Grade Band Performs Third and Final Concert at Skyview Middle School in Bothell

Posted by glennled on June 23, 2019

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5th Grade Band, Skyview Middle School, 06-05-2019

The 44-member fifth grade band performed its third and final concert of the school year under the direction of Dan Carlson on the evening of 5 June at Skyview Middle School in Bothell. The audience of family members, relatives and friends totaled more than 100.

The program was comprised of five pieces:

  • “Frere Jacques” (4-part round)
  • “Major Scale Skill” (Concert Bb Major)
  • “Montego Bay” (Calypso song)
  • “Regal March” (by Bruce Pearson)
  • “Eye of the Tiger” (arr. by Gerald Sebesky)

Mr. Carlson presented awards to 10 students among the three sections: percussion, woodwinds, and brass. The brass section consisted of 9 trumpeters and 7 trombonists. The award categories were Leadership, Most Improved, Most Inspirational, and Most Outstanding.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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My Trumpet Student—First to Perform with Piano Accompanist at Spring Recital, Lessons in Your Home, Seattle

Posted by glennled on May 10, 2019

 

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Trumpet Solo with accompaniment, “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” LIYH Spring Recital, Woodland Park Presbyterian Church, Seattle, 4 May 2019

 

My trumpet student from Mercer Island has now played in three recitals in Seattle featuring students who are enrolled in Lessons in Your Home (LIYH – please see http://www.lessonsinyourhome.net/). But this time, on 4 May, he did something I’ve never seen done by any other student at this semi-annual recital. But before I reveal it, let me tell how it happened.IMG_0316

The mother of this student found me in the fall of 2017 by searching the internet for a private trumpet tutor in the Seattle area. She found me through LIYH (please see http://www.lessonsinyourhome.net). After months of lessons, he played “The Serpent Charmer” in his first LIYH recital in spring, 2018. In the fall recital, he played “La Bamba.” As this spring’s recital approached, I had a bright idea (it happens occasionally). I knew his best friend studies piano. They are classmates at St. Monica Catholic School (pre-K through 8). Why not ask his friend to accompany him on his solo at this spring’s recital?

The friend, his parents, his piano teacher, and the LIYH Seattle Director all said “Yes,” and I furnished the boys with Beginning Trumpet Solos by The Canadian Brass, Fred Mills and Ron Romm, editors (1992). Of the 17 pieces in this collection, they selected “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer in 1908, which has become the unofficial anthem of American baseball. Then began the individual rehearsals, each with his own tutor. Next, on 3 April, we all met for the first joint, coached rehearsal at the piano teacher’s studio on Mercer Island, Jeanne Ellis (please see http://www.trymusiclessons.com/). The rough spots were exposed, and the boys agreed to practice together weekly. When we all met again, five days before the recital, they were much improved. They had even practiced what to do in case they had to re-start during the actual performance. Finally, they rehearsed together twice more before the main event.

Spring Recital, LIYH, Saturday, 4 May, 2:00 p.m. Session, at Woodland Park Presbyterian Church, Seattle, hosted by Scott D’Angelo, Seattle LIYH Director

IMG_0396They were ready. The program listed 27 student soloists, the pieces they would play, and the composer of each piece. Our pair was #10 to perform. Twenty-five (93%) of the soloists were piano students. The other two were a violinist and my trumpet student. Sure enough, my student and his friend were the only performers featuring a student soloist accompanied by another student! Oh, there were a few duets, where the teacher played with the student and in one case, where two brothers played together. But our pair was the standout. In fact, in the three LIYH recitals I’ve attended, they were the first ever to do this. Bully, bully!

It was a very important step in their development as musicians. They attend a private school where there is no band or orchestra. They had to listen and adjust to each other. They had to become a team. Each one had to do his part and carry his load. They had to organize themselves so that they could stay together at their optimal tempo and had to learn how to handle mistakes and recover if they fell apart. They had to be patient and persistent, get along, and help each other. And they got to experience the improvement that hard work and regular practice produce. They experienced the pride of success together. They found that music is richer when there is harmony between different instruments making different sounds. They grew more confident. It’s wonderful to listen to and appreciate beautiful music. It’s a whole different thing to play it.

My student’s mother says this was a big hit with the boys and thanked me “100 times.” The pianist’s mother also is very grateful. (The two mothers are friends.) The boys are planning to play it again at the accompanist’s piano recital on 2 June. Their friendship is now even closer. Music does that—brings people together, doesn’t it? Do you listen and dance and march, or do you play and sing? Do you compose, arrange, improvise, and teach? Lots of people can do three of these, even four, but fewer and fewer can do five to nine of them. Either way, it’s real joy, and it’s really fun.

Please click on any photo below to enlarge it.

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New Trumpet Student #47 from Lockwood Elementary in Bothell Prepares for 5th Grade Band

Posted by glennled on May 9, 2019

th[4]He’s about to finish 4th grade at Lockwood Elementary School in Bothell and has a close friend who has registered for band next year—so he’s registered, too. That’s why he chose trumpet. His mother contacted me on 12 March, and we started weekly private lessons on 2 April. He wants to get a head start.

She bought him the instruction book which the band uses, Standard of Excellence, Book I, by Bruce Pearson. We’re working our way through the early pages and the inside back cover, concentrating on “the first six notes,” C through A of the C Major Scale. He’s learning the very basics: how to hold the trumpet properly, sit properly, buzz in the mouthpiece, understand the route of his air through the valves and slides, oil the valves, release the water that collects in the horn, breathe while playing, set his embouchure to sound each different note, read the time signature, recognize the shapes of quarter, half, and whole notes and rests, play different rhythms at different tempos, and so forth and so on.

Every page introduces new things to learn and master. There is so much to remember to do, all it once! Yet it looks so simple—the trumpet has only three buttons—it appears deceptively easy. He has shown me that he can handle it—and he will master it if he practices. He has the natural ability. He already has a head start. He’s getting better, step by step. And so far, he tells me, he likes playing trumpet. I’ve invited him and his family to attend my 10th Annual Trumpet Recital in Edmonds on 25 May as observers. Here’s hoping he attends next year as a participant.

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