Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

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Posts Tagged ‘combo’

“Bubblelator” Christmas Show at Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on December 29, 2019

 

Christmas in the Bubbleator, 2019_Moment(2)

This year, Alderwood Community Church (ACC) presented its 32nd Christmas musical—-“Christmas in the Bubbleator.” The Bubbleator was a spherical elevator in a building at the Century 21 World’s Fair in Seattle in 1962. (I graduated from the University of Washington that summer, and I rode in the Bubbleator with my parents from Texas.) Five performances produced a total attendance of about 2,800 during 6, 7, 8 December. For the second time, the church had commissioned Matthew Wilson to write a play. The first one was his “New Life of the Land” which also debuted at ACC  (use the Archives column on the left to see my post of 13 December 2017). This one is the sequel to that. _M3A0425

The play takes place in the span of only about two hours on Christmas Eve of 1961, about three months prior to the opening of the World’s Fair. The main character is a high school girl from Alderwood Manor (which was by then part of the new city, Lynnwood). She has applied for a job as a Bubblelator operator, posing as “Jacqueline Clarington,” the daughter of a wealthy San Francisco family. She dreams of living that Big City lifestyle in the future, and this job is to be a first step in that direction (use the Archives column on the left to see my post of 13 December 2017). Christmas in the Bubbleator, 2019_Moment(15)

In fact, she is actually Barbara Beck, the granddaughter of John and Margaret Beck, chicken farmers from Alderwood Manor. When she had applied earlier using her real name and address, Barbara received a rejection letter. But as Jacqueline Clarington from San Francisco, she is virtually already hired after she had an exaggerated, demonstrative interview with the Fair Director. Her grandparents spoiled her imaginative but devious plan. She is stricken by their honesty, goodwill, and love of her, and her conscience compels her to expose her fraud in a late confession to the Fair Director. “Everything I’ve told you is a lie. I wanted to be part of something great, but tonight, I realize that I already am. Oh…Merry Christmas!” The three of them leave the fairgrounds and return to reality—family and church back in Alderwood Manor. To see a high quality video of this entire Christmas show, produced by Monique Anderson for ACC, please see https://vimeo.com/380922775/85e704f214.

The 22-member orchestra, 55-member choir and The Evergreens combo (vocalist, saxophone and vocalist, lead guitar, and bass guitar) performed numerous pieces of music before, during and after the show. The brass section was comprised of three trumpets, three trombones, and one French horn.

Photos are courtesy of Alderwood Community Church. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

The Birth of Jesus Christ

 

ACC Orchestra

 

ACC Choir

 

Cast

 

The Evergreens

 

Scenes From Play

 

Other Scenes

Posted in Church Music, Professional Concerts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

New Student (#51) in Lynnwood Is in the Homeschool Connections Intermediate Jazz Band

Posted by glennled on December 18, 2019

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Classes for the Homeschool Connections Intermediate Jazz Band are held at Woodinville Alliance Church

 

My 51st trumpet student is my first homeschooled student. He now lives in Lynnwood, but until this year, he had been attending Harbour Pointe Middle School in Mukilteo, where he was a band member. When he and his parents decided to leave the public school system, he asked them, “What about playing trumpet in band?” They found the solution at Homeschool Connections (please see http://www.connectionsnw.org).

He participates in the Intermediate Jazz Band class on Wednesdays at Woodinville Alliance Church (http://www.wachurch.us/). There was an evening band concert on 2 December at Northlake Christian Church in Bothell (see http://www.northlakecc.org). It was called the Connections Christmas Concert, featuring the Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Bands; Intermediate and Advanced Jazz Bands; and Jazz Combo.

My first private, half-hour lesson with him was on 20 November. I always listen to my students play before I choose an instruction book for them. From his middle school band days, he still has the Essential Elements, Trumpet, Book 1, so we decided to keep working out of that. In addition, I had him buy 101 Jazz Songs, Trumpet, published by Hal Leonard, so that he can have fun becoming familiar with some well-known pieces.

I found that his range topped out at D on the staff. So, on the first day, I taught him to play “G” above the staff, and before I left, he had played a note above high C above the staff. Also, he was making an “H” sound into the mouthpiece. Students who do that will not be able to play at fast tempos or learn double- and triple-tonguing. So, I taught him to make a “T” sound into the mouthpiece. He now has to work to make these techniques natural and habitual.

At this stage, my first job is to help him learn the fingering and embouchure positions for each note in the chromatic scale. We want him to develop instant recognition of the names and settings for each note within a two-octave range, low to high G. It is not enough to memorize things intellectually. We must learn by doing. That means “practice, practice, practice.”

I asked how he chose the trumpet. He said there was no demonstration at school where he could try playing various instruments. He chose trumpet from photographs!

According to the Homeschool Connections website, the Intermediate Jazz Band is taught by Robin Strangland. She plays and teaches French horn and plays trumpet in the Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra (SWOJO—see http://www.swojo.org). She started the Homeschool Band in this area in 1993. She and her husband run the Northend Jazz Camp. The Advanced Jazz Ensemble is taught by Kevin Hall, trumpeter. He is a Director of Jazz at Henry M. Jackson High School in Mill Creek. Twice, he has received the prestigious “Outstanding Soloist Award” from the International Association of Jazz Educators. He is a Festival Director for the Snohomish Valley and Mill Creek Jazz Festivals. You’ll find more information about both these instructors at http://www.connectionsnw.org/about-us/.

Posted in New Students - Intro Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

10th Annual Trumpet Recital at Our Home in Edmonds

Posted by glennled on June 12, 2019

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When I scheduled my 10th Annual Trumpet Recital for my private students, I thought at least five out of six could make it. But when the 25th of May rolled around, only two actually came to our home in Edmonds and played. Still, it was important, and for those two, their families and friends, and my wife and I, it was significant.

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Victor Snyder plays “The Pals” on his Olds Ambassador cornet

My seventh grader from Mercer Island was first, playing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” and “Give My Regards to Broadway.” Next was my 70-year old from the Bryant neighborhood of Seattle, northeast of the University of Washington (UW). His selections were “When I’m 64,” “The Pals,” and “Roll and Tumble Blues.” For him, there’s a story associated with each of these pieces.

“When I’m 64”—well, he’s past that age and is retired from UW, but he thought his fiancé and her friend would get a kick out of it. The marriage is this July. IMG_5796“The Pals”—this polka was the piece which he played in eighth grade in Indiana in a state trumpet solo contest that he won. He’s still using his original Olds Ambassador cornet, c. 1961 (please see my blog post of 2 February 2019). “Roll and Tumble Blues”—he wants to focus on playing more blues pieces in the future, and there’s a chance he and a friend might form a combo to do it.

I played three songs to end the program, and we all enjoyed refreshments and conversation afterwards.

Photos were taken by my wife. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in Musical Events at Home, Recitals, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

My 45th Student Is Only 70 Years Old

Posted by glennled on February 2, 2019

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Olds Ambassador cornet in its original case with 1962 Indiana state trumpet competition medal pinned inside the lid (left)

Why does the above headline read, “only 70 years old”? Well, because my student #26 was an 81-year old retired engineer (see my blog post of 18 February 2016), and my student #38 was a 76-year old retired Army veteran (see my blog post of 17 November 2017). The 81-year old played a Kanstul cornet, and the veteran played a Getzen bugle. My new student (#45) plays an Olds Ambassador cornet, and as you may remember, I still play a Super Olds cornet given to me by my parents when I entered high school in 1954.

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Olds Ambassador cornet, c. 1961

On 27 December 2018, I had my first private lesson with Victor Snyder at his home in the Bryant neighborhood in Seattle, east of the University of Washington. In fact, in 2015, he retired from UW, where after 20 years of employment, he was the Associate Director, Career Counseling Center [now, Career and Internship Center]. Now that he’s retired, he wants to play cornet again.

The first time Vic played his cornet was when he was a 7th and 8th grade student at St. Pius Catholic School in Tell City, Indiana. In 1962, while in the 8th grade, he won a state solo competition, was graded “superior,” and was awarded a medal by the Indiana School Music Association. He performed “The Pals” polka by George D. Barnard (see photo). The next year, as a freshman, he started taking band at Tell City High School but then dropped it. Nevertheless, his mother saved his cornet and his music, thinking that since he was talented, he might someday take it up again. I’m sure that would make her happy and proud again.

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“The Pals” polka by George D. Barnard can be played as either a solo or duet with piano accompaniment

After high school, Vic earned a Bachelors degree at Kent State University in Ohio, served a tour in the U.S. Navy including being stationed on Whidbey Island in Washington, and then earned a Masters degree at the University of Washington in 1976.  The next time he played his cornet was in 1989, twenty-seven years after winning that medal. He took private lessons for about half a year. The tutor assigned him only exercises in Arbans Complete Conservatory Method: Trumpet, but he wanted to play songs, too. As everyone knows, Arbans is a wonderful instruction book and even contains many old songs, but it is designed for advanced students, not beginners or re-starters. He became bored and frustrated and stopped the lessons.

Now, Vic is taking up the horn once again, simply for his own pleasure. Eventually, he might join a combo with a friend and/or play with a community band and such—or not. He’s really doing this to please himself. He found me through http://www.takelessons.com. His weekly lessons are one-hour long, and he often practices twice a day. He’s working his way through two exercise books that are more appropriate for his current performance level:

  • Rubank Elementary Level, Cornet or Trumpet by A. F. Robinson.
  • Progressive Beginner Trumpet by Peter Gelling.

The skills are coming back, but in addition, Vic is learning much more than he ever did. He knows that I host an annual recital in my home in late May or early June. Perhaps by then, he will be able to play “The Pals” again, but if he wants to play something else, we’ll find the right thing. I’m betting that his mom, who passed away in 2005, would be proud to hear him once more—after all, he’s only 70 and has many more miles yet to go.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

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Arcade Mocha Kicks Off Winter Concert at Skyview Junior High in Bothell

Posted by glennled on December 17, 2012

AM LogoAs the fans filled the stands in the gym at Skyview Junior High in Bothell, they were entertained by Arcade Mocha, a jazz combo formed by eight students in 2011. People were coming for the Winter Concert of the orchestra and 7th, 8th, and 9th-grade bands. Arcade Mocha played Christmas songs and other pieces for half an hour before the concert began.

Vaughan has been my trumpet student since 2010

Vaughan has been my trumpet student since 2010

It was their 19th gig so far (see http://www.facebook.com/ArcadeMocha?ref=ts&fref=ts). They play for festivals, auctions, fundraisers, variety shows, promotional events, and such at malls, stores, coffee shops, churches, schools, and more. For example, during the holidays in 2011, they played at the Barnes and Noble Book Fair in Woodinville, and twice in 2012, they played at the Crossroads Mall in Bellevue. Last November, they played at “This is the Night,” the Skyview Spaghetti Dinner, and helped raise $1,700 in funds for the Music Boosters and

Music Department of the school. Musically, they’ve stepped up into jazz circles by playing twice at afternoon gigs at Tula’s Jazz Club in Belltown in Seattle (see www.tulas.com).

This group of talented teenage musicians launched from the Skyview Jr. High music program (see http://www.nsd.org/education/staff/staff.php?sectionid=429).  They practice, using The Real Book of charts, every Saturday at the home of their booking agent, Dianne Kinney, 425-275-8696, dianne@adamkinney.com.

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

Posted in School Concerts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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