Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

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Posts Tagged ‘Alderwood Community Church’

Trumpeters at 2018 WMEA All-State Music Concerts in Yakima

Posted by glennled on March 23, 2018

Congratulations! Sixty-six trumpeters made WMEA All-State this year. They were spread among 8 different groups: Jazz Band (5), Wind Symphony (8), Concert Band (18), Wind Ensemble (8), Symphony Orchestra (6), Chamber Orchestra (3), Junior Baker Band (9), Junior Rainer Band (9). X-IMG_4905 (2)

All-State recognition is awarded by the Washington Music Educators Association (WMEA)—see http://www.wmea.org. On Friday-Sunday, 16-18 February, WMEA hosted six All-State Concerts in Yakima, Washington

Students apply in the fall for All-State selection and submit an audition recording which is then judged and ranked by a screening committee. Next, the All-State Group Managers assign each selected student to an appropriate ensemble, orchestra, symphony, or band. This year, Mike Mines was Group Manager for the All-State Jazz Band. Others included:

  • Mark M. Schlichting, Symphony Orchestra
  • Chase Chang, Chamber Orchestra
  • Naomi Ihlan, Wind Symphony
  • Andrew Robertson, Concert Band
  • Dan Lundberg, Wind Ensemble

Junior All-Staters come from grades 7 and 8. All-Staters come from grades 9-12. In early January, concert music is sent to those who are selected.

Did you ever wonder where all these trumpeters typically come from? Probably not. But I did. Would you think that Seattle might dominate? Or Bellevue, Tacoma, Everett, Bellingham, Vancouver, or Spokane? Here are the 2018 statistics.

The 48 high school all-staters represent 39 different schools. Ten students came from 7 cities in Eastern Washington, including three from Spokane. Thirty-eight students came from 24 cities in Western Washington.

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ACC Orchestra trumpeters, “New Life of the Land,” Dec 2017 (L to R): Rob Rankin, superb Principal; Corban Epp, Washington All-State Jazz Band (2018); Glenn Ledbetter, Texas All-State Band (1958). Photo by John Crozier.

Schools in Bellevue, Redmond, Tacoma, and Spokane produced three trumpeters each for a total of 12 (25%). Nine schools placed two trumpeters each for a total of 18 (37.5%). Seattle schools were among 18 schools which placed one trumpeter each for a total of 18 (37.5%).

The 18 junior all-staters represent 13 different schools, all located in 9 cities in Western Washington. One school produced five all-state trumpeters—Pacific Cascade Middle School in Issaquah. One of these made the Junior All-State Baker Band, and four made the Junior All-State Rainier Band. Imagine that—five stellar trumpeters in the same middle school band—holy cow, that’s amazing! Congratulations to Philip Dungey, Director, PCMS Bands, himself having a Master’s Degree in Trumpet Performance and Music Education and the Principal Trumpet in the Northwest Symphony Orchestra.

As I wrote in my blog post of 17 February 2012 (see Archives in left column), I really want one or more of my trumpet students to make All-State Band or Orchestra someday. “I want to help someone become the best he or she can be!”

Corban Epp, 4-time WA All-State trumpeter

Corban Epp, Lead Trumpet, Washington All-State Jazz Band, 2018

Among the 66 trumpeters, I have a connection with only one—Corban Epp, a senior at Glacier Peak High School, Snohomish. I had the privilege of playing twice with him and Rob Rankin, a retired Boeing Engineer who is the superb principal trumpet in the Alderwood Community Church Orchestra. We performed together in two Christmas productions, “All I Want for Christmas” (2016) and “New Life of the Land” (2017). Corban played a jazz solo in the former musical.

In Corban’s freshman year, he made All-State Concert Band. As a sophomore, he participated in the All-State Symphony Orchestra. In his junior year, he was selected for All-Northwest Band, and of course, he was chosen for the All-State Jazz Band this year. At the Jazz Band concert on 16 February, Jay Ashby conducted five pieces on the program. Corban played lead trumpet on four of them, and Alessandro Squadrito of Snohomish High School did so on the other. Corban played two solos in the program—one in the song, “El Final Del Verano [End of Summer],” by Armando Rivera, and the other in “Fill in the Blank Blues” by Rosephanye Powell, in which Corban had a solo battle with the whole trumpet section!

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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“New Life of the Land”—2017 Christmas Musical Drama at Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on December 13, 2017

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ACC cast, “New Life of the Land,” Dec. 2017

 

On 1-3 December 2017, Alderwood Community Church (ACC) presented its 29th Christmas program in five public performances, drawing a total audience of more than 3,000. This year marked the 100th year since the Puget Mill Company developed the planned community called Alderwood Manor in 1917. As residents settled there, they wanted a church. In 1920, Alderwood Manor Community Church was born.

To celebrate this 100th anniversary year, ACC commissioned Matthew Wilson to write the play, “New Life of the Land.” Mr. Wilson attended ACC while growing up. It was presented as a musical drama, not a typical musical. None of the main characters sings play-87or dances. In one comedic relief scene, a barbershop quartet is featured as they rehearse “Deck the Halls.” Instead, the orchestra and choir, under the direction of Linda Collins, perform music to open and close the drama; intersperse different scenes with songs; and provide soft, instrumental music (underscore) while the actors continue with the play. The stage sets employ mixed media: some outdoor scenes are presented by videos on three huge screens above the stage floor. The entire drama takes play-95place during slightly more than one hour on Christmas Eve in 1917. A young couple who intend to marry obtains a 5-acre plot of land through the dramatic, providential trade of their train ticket with a stranger at the Alderwood Manor trolley station. They plan to raise chickens to support themselves and their (eventual) children.

The theme of the play is hope. Each of the four main characters have different hopes for themselves and each other. The hopes of Margaret (played by Hannah Blomberg) and Jebediah (Charley Delaney) come true. Eliza (Deborah Turcotte) is forced to abandon her hope for her granddaughter, Margaret. Finally, John (Mike Tate) undergoes a renewal: in the beginning, he has lost hope and is melancholy, having been crippled by polio. He wants to marry Margaret but has no job. In the end, he enthusiastically adopts her hope of staying in Alderwood Manor, establishing a chicken farm, and raising a family there. When they do acquire the land, he proposes marriage, and she accepts. They will enroll in the “New Life of the Land” program created by Puget Mill Company to help settlers learn to raise chickens and certain vegetable crops for sale and family food.

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L to R: Rob Rankin (lead), Corban Epp, (2nd), Glenn Ledbetter (3rd), ACC Orchestra trumpeters

I have now played trumpet in four Christmas programs at ACC. Please see my blog posts of 23 April 2015, 15 December 2015, and 10 December 2016.

More ACC, Alderwood Manor, and Lynnwood History and Future Plans

The musical drama aroused my curiosity. I’ve lived in Edmonds for 14 years and don’t know much about Lynnwood history. What happened after 1917? How did we get to where we are now? Here’s some of what I’ve learned as a result of this Christmas program.

Before 1910, only a few hearty pioneers lived in the area. It took about two days to travel some 13 miles to Seattle. Then, in 1910, the electric trolley line which connected Seattle to

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Linda Collins, ACC Orchestra and Choir Conductor

the Esperance stop near Hall’s Lake was extended to Everett. That cut the travel time from the Forest Park stop (later re-named the Alderwood Manor stop) to about one hour.

Around the turn of the 20th century, the Puget Mill Company owned thousands of acres of forest land north of Seattle. Once the land was logged, taxes remained the same as if it still was timbered. To reduce its tax burden, the company decided to sell off some 7,000 acres then covered with blackened stumps and snags. In 1917, it offered land for sale in 5- and 10-acre parcels, known as “stump farms,” within a planned community that it named “Alderwood Manor.” [Incidentally, 1917 is the year of my mother’s birth, may she rest in peace; it’s also the year that the Ballard Locks officially opened for boat traffic and America entered World War I.] play-127

The Seattle-Everett Interurban Railway ran through Alderwood Manor. Just east of the electric trolley tracks, Puget Mill Company built a 30-acre Demonstration Farm to promote land sales. Here, land purchasers could learn to raise chickens, farm fish, and grow fruits and vegetables both for sale and family food. “New Life of the Land” was the name of this project. On the Demonstration Farm was a superintendent’s cottage, hotel, community hall. water tower, chicken houses, and an incubator house. The preferred chicken species was the single comb white leghorn. By 1921, the American Poultry Association had recognized Alderwood Manor as one of the nation’s greatest poultry centers.

Meanwhile, the early residents had a strong desire for a Christian church in their community. They began by meeting for Sunday School in private homes in 1919. On 28 November 1920, Alderwood Manor Community Church was born. They built a wood-frame building on the present site of ACC.

Through the years, things changed. Highway 99, to the west, was completed in 1927. The play-31Great Depression hit Alderwood Manor hard, the price of eggs fell, and many residents left the business. Land parcels were subdivided and sold off. The Demonstration Farm was closed. In 1939, the crucial Interurban Railed ceased operations.

In the late 1940’s, after World War II, a community named Lynnwood (named after Lynn, a real estate agent’s wife) began to emerge around the intersection of Highway 99 and 196th Street SW. In 1939, the Interurban railway was converted into a power line corridor. In the 1990s, the right-of-way was opened to pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Today, the Interurban Trail is a 16-mile, hard-surfaced, non-motorized, rail trail.

The City of Lynnwood is now planning another major transformation. It is converting to high-density, high-rise, mixed-use (commercial and residential) zoning in its City Center. Among the regulatory changes is this: the maximum allowable building height in the City Center Core is up to 350 feet. Assuming that one story equals 10 feet, that’s a building height of 35 stories! The City’s long-range, 20-year vision is to become the “Bellevue of the North.” The current population of Lynnwood is about 38,000. play-118

Much of Alderwood Manor and Lynnwood history is preserved in Heritage Park which opened in 2004 at 19921 Poplar Way. Even some of the original buildings and a railway car, Interurban Car 55, are located there. For more information about this area’s history and its future plans, please see:

 

play-1202020 will be ACC’s 100th anniversary. I wonder what musical they will choose for their 32nd Christmas program. Will I still be playing trumpet and blogging in 2020, at age 80? As my dear, late mother-in-law, may she rest in peace, was fond of saying, “Time waits for no man.”

Photos courtesy of John Crozier, http://www.crozierphotography.com. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

 

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“All I Want for Christmas,” the 2016 Musical at Alderwood Community Church, Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on December 10, 2016

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Curtain Call, “All I Want for Christmas”

More than 3,100 people, spread over six performances, came to see this year’s musical, “All I Want for Christmas,” at Alderwood Community Church (ACC) in Lynnwood. This is the 28th consecutive Christmas show produced by the church (see http://www.amcc.org). And it is the second straight year that the play was written by Lauri Evans Deason of Los Angeles (see my blog post of 15 December 2015). And it is the third consecutive time that I have played trumpet in the ACC Orchestra at these Christmas productions. I am continually impressed with how much talent of all ages there is among these church members.

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Glenn Ledbetter, 2016

The lead character is Lyric Jensen, played admirably by McKenna Sessions, a high school senior with a lovely voice and accomplished singing style. Lyric’s birth mother, Molly, abandoned her when she was only two-days old in a manger in the nativity scene in front of a church on Christmas day. The Jensens, Steven and Nora, found her and adopted her. Nora died three years later, and Steve continued to raise her.

Seeking greater happiness at age 17, Lyric longs to find her birth mother. Instead, she finds a woman who is later exposed as an imposter, pretending to be her birth mother in hopes of financial gain. Lyric realizes that real love and happiness is with her Dad. The story is an allegory about God’s unconditional love for humankind, his adopted children.

For me, the hit songs in the musical are “All I Want for Christmas,” “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” and “When Love Takes You In.” The first is by Mariah Carey and Walter Afanasieff (see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXQViqx6GMY). The second is by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Jean Baptiste Calkin, with new words and music by Bernie Herms, Mark Hall and Dale Oliver, arranged by Dave Williamson. The third is by Steven Curtis Chapman, orchestrated by Sherry Joos.

The musical photos are courtesy of John Crozier, http://www.crozierphotography.com. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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“Home for Christmas” at Alderwood Community Church, Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on December 15, 2015

 

Who says Christmas plays and musicals have virtually disappeared? Not at Alderwood Community Church (ACC) in Lynnwood, where some 2,800 people attended five performances of Home for Christmas on the weekend X-IMG_7386

of 4-6 December. And another 600 attended the dress rehearsal and preview performances, for a grand total of 3,400!

No wonder. This was the 27th straight year this church has produced a Christmas show. Linda Collins, Music Director, started the tradition in 1989. And this was the second time this particular musical has been presented at ACC; the first time was in 2006. Before that, it had premiered at University Presbyterian Church in Seattle. [Where were you in 1989? That’s when I started my real estate career on Mercer Island. I was no member of any church.]

At ACC last weekend, I was one of three trumpeters who played in the orchestra. My new (to me) Getzen Eterna Severinsen trumpet arrived just in the nick of time for me to play it in all five performances (see my post about it on 14 December).

The story goes like this. Laine Wilson has invited Adam Owens to meet her family at their home on Christmas Eve. Adam intends to “pop the question” and has an engagement ring in his pocket. But things go amiss, and therein lies some comedy. For one thing, the image he presents to her father, a very successful, nationally known psychologist and author, Dr. Ron, does not go well. Meanwhile, there are songs to be sung, dances to be danced, and stories to be told. Through it all, he feels worse and worse, loses all confidence, and gets ice-cold feet. Just as he is about to give up, turn around and walk away, Laine poses a life-changing question. How does he respond? What lessons does he learn? You’ll have to see it to believe it.

The script, written and copyrighted by Lauri Evans Deason of Los Angeles, has no music. It simply indicates where it is appropriate to insert music. Ultimately, Linda Collins chose the 10 pieces of music for choir and orchestra that were used in this production, converting what was an allegorical stage play into a musical. For this production, Deason updated the original script, mostly changing some dialogue to reflect “the way our culture has been forever altered by (among other things) smart phone apps, selfies, and a certain snow queen we’d never heard of in 2005.” She called this opportunity “the best anniversary present ever.”

As I have said, I like musicals that plant a melody in my head and have me singing afterwards (see my posts of 6 June 2014, and 23 April 2015, about the musicals, A Room With a View, and A Time for Christmas, respectively). In this case, on the day after the last performance, I found myself humming phrases from three pieces of music:

  • “The Sounds of Christmas” Arr by Bradley Knight
  • “Happy Birthday, Jesus” by Carol Cymbala
  • “Oh, What a Love!” by Carol Cymbala

Linda Collins told me that another great piece, “Laine’s Song,” was written especially for this musical back in 2006, by the pianist in the ACC orchestra, Darla Sewall. It was orchestrated by Sherry Joos.

I suppose ACC (see http://www.alderwoodchurchfamily.org/) will get around to presenting this production again in another 9 or 10 years. When they do, “Try it. You’ll like it.”

Please click on any photo below to enlarge it. All were taken by John Crozier of Edmonds (see http://www.crozierphotography.com).

 

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My New Getzen Eterna Severinsen Trumpet

Posted by glennled on December 14, 2015

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Getzen Eterna Severinsen Model (900S)

 

My beautiful, loving wife bought me the most wonderful Christmas gift! My new B-flat trumpet was delivered to our home in the late afternoon of Friday, 4 December, just a couple of hours before I was due to perform in the musical, Home for Christmas, with the Alderwood Community Church Orchestra in Lynnwood. I blew a few notes from low G to high C, took it with me, and played it in public that very evening.

It was manufactured by Getzen Company in Elkhorn, Wisconsin in c.1977. It’s the 900S model  with medium large bore (.460″), Amado water keys, first-valve trigger, third-valve slide, bright silver plate finish, and case.

It was named for Carl “Doc” Severinsen, who was then Vice President of Research and Development. Severinsen is a nationally famous television artist (most notably, Music Director, “The Tonight Show” with Johnny Carson), a clinician, and guest soloist. According to the company’s 1977 brochure, it took almost two years of development before the model was accepted for market. It’s designed and built for professional trumpeters. One of the all-time great jazz trumpeters, Freddy Hubbard, is among the pros who played this model.

I’ll be using it not only to play gigs but also in teaching private lessons. I’m thrilled. What a great Christmas present!

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5th Annual Trumpet Recital at My Home

Posted by glennled on June 22, 2014

Sarah, Robert, Finn, Glenn Ledbetter, Erik, and Vaughan

Sarah, Robert, Finn, Glenn Ledbetter, Erik, and Vaughan

Fanfare for the Common Man by Aaron Copland was the featured piece on the program on Sunday, 8 June, when my wife and I hosted our fifth annual trumpet recital in our home in Edmonds. Coincidentally, on 25 May, I played the same powerful, dignified piece with the 13-person, brass and percussion ensemble at Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood (see my post of 18 June 2014).

Copland wrote Fanfare for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in 1942, shortly after America entered World War II, and it premiered on income tax day, 12 March 1943. As America built up its war effort, the Vice President of the USA called the 20th century the “Century of the Common Man.” Copland borrowed that phrase to entitle his brass ensemble piece.

Aaron Copland, 1900-1990

Aaron Copland, 1900-1990

At the recital, however, we had only the three trumpet parts—no French horns, trombones, tuba, timpany, tam-tam, or bass drum. And the three trumpeters come from different high schools—one at Bothell, one at Juanita, and one at Inglemoor. Later in the program, each played a solo piece. The Bothell High sophomore played “Aire” by Johann Sebastian Bach. The sophomore at Juanita played “Le Tambourin” by Jean Philippe Rameau. And the Inglemoor High junior played “Etude 1” by Sigmund Hering.

In between Fanfare and the older students’ solos, my fifth grader from Morningside Academy played “Ode to Joy” and “Sawmill Creek.” Next came my seventh grader from Hamilton International Middle School, playing “The Victor” by R.M. Endresen and “Riqui Ran,” a Latin-American folk song arranged by James Curnow.

Recitals give parents, relatives and friends proof that private lessons work in helping build musicianship and character.

Various photos were taken by Ping Qian, Leslie Lowell, Nancy MacDonald and Glenn Ledbetter. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

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“Fanfare for the Common Man”—Brass Ensemble at Alderwood Community Church, Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on June 18, 2014

Aaron Copland, composer, teacher, writer, conductor, 1900-1990

Aaron Copland, composer, teacher, writer, conductor, 1900-1990

On Sunday, 25 May, I played trumpet in the Brass Ensemble, conducted by Linda Collins, at Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood. During the worship service, recognition was given to Memorial Day, which was to be celebrated across the nation the next day.

Our featured piece was the thrilling Fanfare for the Common Man by Aaron Copland, written in 1942 and first performed in 1943 during World War II. It’s powerful and brings dignity to every event at which it is played. In America, regardless of status, we are all common—“All men are created equal,” and it’s “One man, one vote.”

Here are some videos of performances by others which pay tribute to the USA and its military men and women: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXytluK9QVk and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGu5Iz_h7Yo.

In the gallery of caricatures below, credit is given where the artist is known to me. Please click on any image to enlarge it.

 

Posted in Ceremonies & Celebrations, Church Music | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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