Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

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Posts Tagged ‘instrumental’

North Creek High School’s First Music Concert, Bothell

Posted by glennled on December 17, 2017

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First music concert at the new North Creek High School, Bothell, 7 December 2017

Pearl Harbor Day—that’s what I first think of when I hear the date, 7 Dec. But that was 1941, and on that date in 2017, people with kids in the band, orchestra, and choir at the new North Creek High School (NCHS) in Bothell will also remember it as the date when NCHS held its very first music concert. And I shall remember the concert for yet another reason—9 of my former students played their instruments that night in the Jazz Band, Symphonic Band, and Wind Ensemble.

IMG_4471 - Trumpeter & Guitarist
Trumpeter and guitari

Of the six trumpet players in Symphonic Band, I taught five of them at Skyview Jr. High School and gave three of them private lessons. Of the two trumpeters in Jazz Band, I gave one of them private lessons. Of the five trumpet players in Wind Ensemble, I taught one of them both in private lessons and classes at Skyview. He now plays guitar in Jazz Band and trumpet in Wind Ensemble. In fact, he played a solo during “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” by the Jazz Band.

Since then, three of my ex-students have switched to other instruments: one to oboe, one to French horn, and one to tuba.

IMG_4517 (2) - Dr. Debbie Montague, Director of Instrumental Music

Dr. Debbie Montague, NCHS Director of Instrumental Music

Listening to the excellent instrumental music, conducted by Debbie Montague, Ph.D., Director of Instrumental Music, I was very proud of my ex-students’ progress. They have much more to anticipate under her tutelage. Dr. Montague came to NCHS from Kenmore Jr. High School, where she had developed an outstanding program. Her Symphonic Bands at KJHS performed throughout the USA, including the National Conference for Music Educators (2002) and at multiple Festivals of Gold, which are high school festivals by invitation. I’ve blogged about this twice—please see my posts of 16 March 2012 and 13 November 2010. Dr. Montague is a member of the Washington Music Educators’ Hall of Fame (www.wmea.org).

She believes in education of the whole child and advocates “hands-on, activity-based music curriculum for all children.” Also, she has considerable accomplishments in African ensemble music.

But this concert was not all about trumpets and other wind instruments, bands, and IMG_4458 (2) - Teresa Sullivan, Director of Choral Music & Nick Tagabensembles. The orchestra and several choirs performed excellently, too. Terresa (Terry) Sullivan, Director of Choral Music, conducted five choirs, singing eight pieces. Ms. Sullivan came to NCHS from Inglemoor High School in Kenmore, where she was both Choir Director and Music Department Chair (see my post of 29 April 2015). The Combined Choir closed with “Carol of the Bells.” The orchestra, conducted by Dr. Montague, played two pieces led by the concertmaster, who is a member of the All-State Orchestra.

The final group to perform was the Wind Ensemble. “A Christmas Flourish” was their first piece, and they concluded the concert with “African Holy Night.”

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

NCHS Jazz Band

 

NCHS Symphonic Band

NCHS Wind Ensemble

 

NCHS Orchestra

NCHS Choirs

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“New Life of the Land”—2017 Christmas Musical Drama at Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood

Posted by glennled on December 13, 2017

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ACC cast, “New Life of the Land,” Dec. 2017

 

On 1-3 December 2017, Alderwood Community Church (ACC) presented its 29th Christmas program in five public performances, drawing a total audience of more than 3,000. This year marked the 100th year since the Puget Mill Company developed the planned community called Alderwood Manor in 1917. As residents settled there, they wanted a church. In 1920, Alderwood Manor Community Church was born.

To celebrate this 100th anniversary year, ACC commissioned Matthew Wilson to write the play, “New Life of the Land.” Mr. Wilson attended ACC while growing up. It was presented as a musical drama, not a typical musical. None of the main characters sings play-87or dances. In one comedic relief scene, a barbershop quartet is featured as they rehearse “Deck the Halls.” Instead, the orchestra and choir, under the direction of Linda Collins, perform music to open and close the drama; intersperse different scenes with songs; and provide soft, instrumental music (underscore) while the actors continue with the play. The stage sets employ mixed media: some outdoor scenes are presented by videos on three huge screens above the stage floor. The entire drama takes play-95place during slightly more than one hour on Christmas Eve in 1917. A young couple who intend to marry obtains a 5-acre plot of land through the dramatic, providential trade of their train ticket with a stranger at the Alderwood Manor trolley station. They plan to raise chickens to support themselves and their (eventual) children.

The theme of the play is hope. Each of the four main characters have different hopes for themselves and each other. The hopes of Margaret (played by Hannah Blomberg) and Jebediah (Charley Delaney) come true. Eliza (Deborah Turcotte) is forced to abandon her hope for her granddaughter, Margaret. Finally, John (Mike Tate) undergoes a renewal: in the beginning, he has lost hope and is melancholy, having been crippled by polio. He wants to marry Margaret but has no job. In the end, he enthusiastically adopts her hope of staying in Alderwood Manor, establishing a chicken farm, and raising a family there. When they do acquire the land, he proposes marriage, and she accepts. They will enroll in the “New Life of the Land” program created by Puget Mill Company to help settlers learn to raise chickens and certain vegetable crops for sale and family food.

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L to R: Rob Rankin (lead), Corban Epp, (2nd), Glenn Ledbetter (3rd), ACC Orchestra trumpeters

I have now played trumpet in four Christmas programs at ACC. Please see my blog posts of 23 April 2015, 15 December 2015, and 10 December 2016.

More ACC, Alderwood Manor, and Lynnwood History and Future Plans

The musical drama aroused my curiosity. I’ve lived in Edmonds for 14 years and don’t know much about Lynnwood history. What happened after 1917? How did we get to where we are now? Here’s some of what I’ve learned as a result of this Christmas program.

Before 1910, only a few hearty pioneers lived in the area. It took about two days to travel some 13 miles to Seattle. Then, in 1910, the electric trolley line which connected Seattle to

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Linda Collins, ACC Orchestra and Choir Conductor

the Esperance stop near Hall’s Lake was extended to Everett. That cut the travel time from the Forest Park stop (later re-named the Alderwood Manor stop) to about one hour.

Around the turn of the 20th century, the Puget Mill Company owned thousands of acres of forest land north of Seattle. Once the land was logged, taxes remained the same as if it still was timbered. To reduce its tax burden, the company decided to sell off some 7,000 acres then covered with blackened stumps and snags. In 1917, it offered land for sale in 5- and 10-acre parcels, known as “stump farms,” within a planned community that it named “Alderwood Manor.” [Incidentally, 1917 is the year of my mother’s birth, may she rest in peace; it’s also the year that the Ballard Locks officially opened for boat traffic and America entered World War I.] play-127

The Seattle-Everett Interurban Railway ran through Alderwood Manor. Just east of the electric trolley tracks, Puget Mill Company built a 30-acre Demonstration Farm to promote land sales. Here, land purchasers could learn to raise chickens, farm fish, and grow fruits and vegetables both for sale and family food. “New Life of the Land” was the name of this project. On the Demonstration Farm was a superintendent’s cottage, hotel, community hall. water tower, chicken houses, and an incubator house. The preferred chicken species was the single comb white leghorn. By 1921, the American Poultry Association had recognized Alderwood Manor as one of the nation’s greatest poultry centers.

Meanwhile, the early residents had a strong desire for a Christian church in their community. They began by meeting for Sunday School in private homes in 1919. On 28 November 1920, Alderwood Manor Community Church was born. They built a wood-frame building on the present site of ACC.

Through the years, things changed. Highway 99, to the west, was completed in 1927. The play-31Great Depression hit Alderwood Manor hard, the price of eggs fell, and many residents left the business. Land parcels were subdivided and sold off. The Demonstration Farm was closed. In 1939, the crucial Interurban Railed ceased operations.

In the late 1940’s, after World War II, a community named Lynnwood (named after Lynn, a real estate agent’s wife) began to emerge around the intersection of Highway 99 and 196th Street SW. In 1939, the Interurban railway was converted into a power line corridor. In the 1990s, the right-of-way was opened to pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Today, the Interurban Trail is a 16-mile, hard-surfaced, non-motorized, rail trail.

The City of Lynnwood is now planning another major transformation. It is converting to high-density, high-rise, mixed-use (commercial and residential) zoning in its City Center. Among the regulatory changes is this: the maximum allowable building height in the City Center Core is up to 350 feet. Assuming that one story equals 10 feet, that’s a building height of 35 stories! The City’s long-range, 20-year vision is to become the “Bellevue of the North.” The current population of Lynnwood is about 38,000. play-118

Much of Alderwood Manor and Lynnwood history is preserved in Heritage Park which opened in 2004 at 19921 Poplar Way. Even some of the original buildings and a railway car, Interurban Car 55, are located there. For more information about this area’s history and its future plans, please see:

 

play-1202020 will be ACC’s 100th anniversary. I wonder what musical they will choose for their 32nd Christmas program. Will I still be playing trumpet and blogging in 2020, at age 80? As my dear, late mother-in-law, may she rest in peace, was fond of saying, “Time waits for no man.”

Photos courtesy of John Crozier, http://www.crozierphotography.com. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

 

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Beginning My 4th Year with Elementary Bands at Skyview Jr. High, Bothell

Posted by glennled on April 10, 2015

I’m back! Lucky me, commencing on 8 September 2014, with the first class of this school year, I get to continue teaching beginning brass students at Skyline Jr. High School in Bothell. Fifth and sixth grade band students arrive early in the morning at Skyline for band classes, and afterwards, they go to their respective schools, Fernwood, Crystal Springs, and Canyon Creek elementary schools for regular classes. Shawn McGinn is the Director of Instrumental Music at Skyline.

I teach brass sectionals on Mondays-Thursdays, including trumpets, trombones, French horns, and baritones. On Fridays, I teach the full 2nd year elementary band, comprised of 6th graders. We present three concerts by the fifth and sixth grade bands each year. It’s fun!

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Photo Gallery of Winter Concert at Skyview Jr. High in Bothell, 12-12-’12

Posted by glennled on December 20, 2012

Please click on any of the 32 photos to enlarge it.

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Photo Gallery—5th through 9th Grade Bands in May Concert at Skyview Jr. High in Bothell

Posted by glennled on May 26, 2012

The two elementary bands were joined at their final concert of the 2011-12 school year by the 8th-9th grade band on 15 May at Skyview Jr. High School in Bothell. The elementary students come from Fernwood, Crystal Springs, and Canyon Creek elementary schools. The concert was conducted by Mr. Shawn McGinn, Director of Instrumental Music. I am his assistant for elementary brass instruction (trumpet, trombone, French horn, and baritone).  The concert left the parents, relatives and friends in the audience excited about the benefits to and growth of these kids through playing music! We hope many will go to a summer band camp. Here are selected photos from the concert. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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Another of My Trumpet Students Makes Seattle All-City Elementary Honors Band

Posted by glennled on February 17, 2012

For the second year in a row, one of my trumpet students has been selected by the Seattle Public Schools music program to perform in the annual All-City Elementary Instrumental Music Honors Concert. The band will play at Chief Sealth International High School, 2600 SW Thistle, Seattle, on Saturday, 31 March, at 4 p.m. The concert is free.

Students were selected because of their dedication to improving their skills and their exemplary musicianship. The event celebrates their success and provides the city schools’ best 5th-grade musicians the opportunity to play together among their peers. I’m very proud of my student—indeed, he is among the best! He attends Lawton Elementary School in Magnolia, where Lindsey Dustin is the Instrumental Music Teacher (see www.LawtonElementary.org).

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Elementary Honors Concert–Orchestra, Choir, Band–Northshore School District

Posted by glennled on February 16, 2011

Something special happened in Bothell last night—315 young musicians filled the floor of the spacious gymnasium at Northshore Junior High School and gave the adoring audience some thrilling sounds! It was the annual Honors Concert of the 22 elementary schools within

Honors Band (foreground), Orchestra (center), and Choir (background); Mr. Shawn McGinn (lower left)

the Northshore School District. Equally packed were the stands, overflowing into standing-room-only spaces for the many relatives and friends in attendance. And outside in the rain, their cars crammed into every feasible space in the school lots and out along the streets of the surrounding neighborhood for blocks. This was a big deal!

I attended because I teach some of the kids in the 105-member Honors Band. I am an Instructional Assistant to Mr. Shawn McGinn, band director at Skyview Junior High (see my blog post, “Glenn Now Teaches Brass…,” 6 September 2010). On Mondays, I teach the trumpeters and trombonists of the 2nd-year elementary band, and on Fridays, I conduct that entire band.

From Mr. McGinn’s band program, 15 students were selected for Honors Band. Of these, there were three flutists, four clarinetists, one bass clarinetist, one percussionist, two trombonists, and four trumpeters. They come from either Canyon Creek, Crystal Springs, or Fernwood elementary schools. I’m so proud of them all.

Honors Band, Janie McDavid conducting

Janie McDavid conducted the Honors Band. She currently teaches elementary instrumental music at Kenmore Junior High and Meridian Park and Echo Lake elementary schools. She led the band in three selections which ended the concert: “American Spirit March,” “The Tempest,” and “Eye of the Tiger.” Outstanding!

    

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