Glenn’s Trumpet Notes

News & Tips for Trumpet & Cornet Students

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Posts Tagged ‘bands’

My 39th Trumpet Student Is a North Creek High School Freshman

Posted by glennled on January 13, 2018

My 39th trumpet student is no stranger to me—I taught him a few years ago in 5th and 6th grade bands at Skyview Jr. High School (now a middle school), and twice he has 0511-1007-0317-2348_Cartoon_of_a_Guy_Playing_a_Trumpet_clipart_image[1]sounded “Echo Taps” with me, first on 2016 Memorial Day and again on 2017 Veterans Day. Now, as a freshman, he is the lead trumpeter in the Symphonic Band and Jazz Band at the new North Creek High School in Bothell. (Please see my posts of 22 July 2016 and 17 December 2017 in the Archives column to the left.)

Our first private lesson was on 8 January 2018. He plays basketball and will run track in the spring, but he has a 2-month window in January-February where he is not overwhelmed and has time for weekly trumpet lessons. His goals are to increase his range and stamina and improve his ability to read rhythms, especially in jazz. So I had him order two excellent instruction books:

  • Twenty-Seven Groups of Exercises for Cornet and Trumpet, by Earl D. Irons
  • Complete Jazz Trumpet Book, by Mel Bay

When the lessons cease, he can continue to improve on his own, and when he wants to resume lessons, I’ll be ready to help.

To enlarge the clip art, simply click on it.

Posted in New Students - Intro Posts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

North Creek High School’s First Music Concert, Bothell

Posted by glennled on December 17, 2017

IMG_4396

First music concert at the new North Creek High School, Bothell, 7 December 2017

Pearl Harbor Day—that’s what I first think of when I hear the date, 7 Dec. But that was 1941, and on that date in 2017, people with kids in the band, orchestra, and choir at the new North Creek High School (NCHS) in Bothell will also remember it as the date when NCHS held its very first music concert. And I shall remember the concert for yet another reason—9 of my former students played their instruments that night in the Jazz Band, Symphonic Band, and Wind Ensemble.

IMG_4471 - Trumpeter & Guitarist
Trumpeter and guitari

Of the six trumpet players in Symphonic Band, I taught five of them at Skyview Jr. High School and gave three of them private lessons. Of the two trumpeters in Jazz Band, I gave one of them private lessons. Of the five trumpet players in Wind Ensemble, I taught one of them both in private lessons and classes at Skyview. He now plays guitar in Jazz Band and trumpet in Wind Ensemble. In fact, he played a solo during “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy” by the Jazz Band.

Since then, three of my ex-students have switched to other instruments: one to oboe, one to French horn, and one to tuba.

IMG_4517 (2) - Dr. Debbie Montague, Director of Instrumental Music

Dr. Debbie Montague, NCHS Director of Instrumental Music

Listening to the excellent instrumental music, conducted by Debbie Montague, Ph.D., Director of Instrumental Music, I was very proud of my ex-students’ progress. They have much more to anticipate under her tutelage. Dr. Montague came to NCHS from Kenmore Jr. High School, where she had developed an outstanding program. Her Symphonic Bands at KJHS performed throughout the USA, including the National Conference for Music Educators (2002) and at multiple Festivals of Gold, which are high school festivals by invitation. I’ve blogged about this twice—please see my posts of 16 March 2012 and 13 November 2010. Dr. Montague is a member of the Washington Music Educators’ Hall of Fame (www.wmea.org).

She believes in education of the whole child and advocates “hands-on, activity-based music curriculum for all children.” Also, she has considerable accomplishments in African ensemble music.

But this concert was not all about trumpets and other wind instruments, bands, and IMG_4458 (2) - Teresa Sullivan, Director of Choral Music & Nick Tagabensembles. The orchestra and several choirs performed excellently, too. Terresa (Terry) Sullivan, Director of Choral Music, conducted five choirs, singing eight pieces. Ms. Sullivan came to NCHS from Inglemoor High School in Kenmore, where she was both Choir Director and Music Department Chair (see my post of 29 April 2015). The Combined Choir closed with “Carol of the Bells.” The orchestra, conducted by Dr. Montague, played two pieces led by the concertmaster, who is a member of the All-State Orchestra.

The final group to perform was the Wind Ensemble. “A Christmas Flourish” was their first piece, and they concluded the concert with “African Holy Night.”

Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

NCHS Jazz Band

 

NCHS Symphonic Band

NCHS Wind Ensemble

 

NCHS Orchestra

NCHS Choirs

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2014 Winter All Bands Concert by Hamilton International Middle School in Seattle

Posted by glennled on April 27, 2015

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HIMS 2014 Winter All Bands Concert concludes after Dan Rowe conducted “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson

 

One of the outstanding music programs in Seattle did it again—four Hamilton International Middle School bands gave a great “Winter All Bands Concert” at Lincoln High School Auditorium on 11 December 2014.

Each band performed four pieces. Among those by the 48-member Beginning Band, conducted by Angela Babbitt, was “March Miniature” by Dan Rowe. The other three bands were conducted by Mr. Rowe himself. The 72-member Cadet Band was next, and two of its pieces were by Mark Williams, “Drive” and “Bryce Canyon Overture.”

Beginning with the 66-member Concert Band, some soloists and an ensemble started to emerge from the two remaining bands. The ensemble was featured in “Drums A-Plenty,” arranged by Lew Pollack. And finally, when the 70-member Symphonic Band took the stage, the spotlight fell on an accomplished xylophone soloist, playing “Galop” by Dimitri Kabalevsky.

A gallery of photos of the four bands follows (below). Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

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High School Band Day, 9-20-’14, UW Huskies vs. Georgia State Panthers

Posted by glennled on April 12, 2015

Georgia State hardly had a chance–the University of Washington Huskies never (hardly ever) loose on High School Band Day! And two-legged dogs always beat two-legged cats, no? And so it was on 20 September 2014, that UW came out on top, 45-14, scoring all 45 points in the second half. The first half was a stinker for the Huskies, who got booed off the field into the locker room to re-group. In any case, the win left the Huskies with a 4-0 record thus far in the season.

Could it be that the combined bands’ massive half-time show on High School Band Day inspired the Huskies to come back from 0-14 to win? 😉

Here’s how the bands did it—see the photo gallery below. As always, trumpeters are featured. Field-level shots were taken by Louis Figueroa, and press box shots were by Garry Nakayama. Please click on any photo to enlarge it.

 

 

Posted in HMBAA - Husky Alumni Band | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Four Bands Wow the Crowd at Kamiakin Jr. High Concert in Kirkland

Posted by glennled on April 7, 2011

Nine masked trumpeters from the Concert Band (7th grade) perform "Phantom Trumpets"

If you were required by state law to attend one band concert this year at a junior high school in Western Washington, you would have to consider going to Kirkland to hear the bands directed by Ward S. Brannman. He runs a top-notch program, and the music produced by his young musicians at a concert last Tuesday was proof.

Leading off the concert was the Kamiakin Jazz Ensemble playing, among other charts, “Night and Day” by Cole Porter. Next, the Concert (7th Grade) Band performed three pieces: “Dance of the Witches,” “Irish Festival,” and “Phantom Trumpets.” In the latter, nine trumpeters wore masks and came to the front to play (see photo). One of them is a student of mine. I was very proud.

50-member Wind Ensemble

“Dance of the Witches” is a theme (in 6/8 time) written by John Williams for the 1987 movie, The Witches of Eastwick.Third was the Symphonic (8th Grade) Band, playing “Overture in C Minor” by Eric Osterling and “El Camino” by Jerry Nowak. Again, the trumpet section was featured in a mariachi section of “El Camino.” Finally, the Wind Ensemble performed Vaclav Nelhybel’s “Lyrical March,” featuring a flute solo and a trumpet duet. Five selections from Les Miserables, arranged by Warren Barket, concluded this special concert. The stage production of this popular musical debuted 25 years ago. Trumpet solos were featured in two of the selections.

Mr. Ward S. Brannman, Director

I know from tutoring one of his trumpet players that Mr. Brannman is diligent about setting high goals for his students and then encouraging, expecting, and rewarding excellence. At the same time, he mixes lots of fun, excitement, and recognition into his music program. This is the second concert of his which I’ve attended (see my post of 19 February 2010). 

At this concert, for example, the teachers of Helen Keller Elementary School and the Quest Program of the Lake Washington School District were honored. Many band students read testimonials thanking

48-member Concert Band (7th grade)

their favorite teachers for good learning experiences in elementary school. Mr. Brannman also passed out several awards to various band members. And finally, he selected music that featured some of his best musicians. He builds pride and self-esteem through superior performance. Go hear his bands when you have the opportunity, whether or not it’s required by law!

55-member Symphonic Band (8th grade)

 

27-member Kamiakin Jazz Ensemble

Posted in School Concerts | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Check it Out–Honk! Fest West in Seattle, 13-15 May 2011

Posted by glennled on March 24, 2011

Honk! Fest West 2010, Hubbub Club, Photo by Joe Mabel

Honk! Fest West 2010, Yellow Hat Band, Photo by Joe Mabel
Honk! Fest West 2010, Orkestar Slivovica, Photo by Joe Mabel

Several of my students want to play in a group someday but either are not yet ready or haven’t found one to join. You are not alone. Many people all over the Greater Seattle area have the same desire, and if you go to the 4th annual Honk! Fest West on 13-15 May, you’ll see hundreds of other musicians. Bring your own trumpet, if you want–you’ll find a way to play–or just come to listen and meet people. “No noise is illegal!” they say about this street fair.

Honk! Fest brings out musicians of all stripes and sounds. This year about 20 bands “large and small (anywhere from 8 – 60 members) will come from 7 states and one Canadian province, ready with old ditties, new tunes, fighting songs, protest marches, funeral dirges, swinging gospel, Balkan folk, tin pan jazz, and everything in between marching bands, samba lines, horn players, drum corps, and others,” according to the festival’s website, http://honkfestwest.com. Among the 11 bands from the Seattle area are the Seattle Seahawks Blue Thunder Drumline, Seattle Sounders FC Soundwave, Tubaluba, Orkestar Zirkonium, and two bands from Garfield High School. Or maybe you’d rather hear the bands coming from Montana, California, Arizona, Illinois, Oregon, or British Columbia. At the Honk! Fest West website, you’ll find links to the websites of most of these bands, where you can see pictures and hear samples of their music.

On Friday, the main site is in Georgetown, and on Saturday, it moves to Fremont and Gasworks Park. The finale on Sunday is at Seattle Center and the International Fountain. For more details, visit the above website. Ask about the Pick-Up Band that will be formed during this event. Now mark your calendars, and maybe I’ll see you there, somewhere!

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And the Trumpet Shall Sound in the Church Orchestra

Posted by glennled on December 25, 2010

This past Sunday was different from any other in my long life. I’ve played in marching bands, drum and bugle corps, concert bands, orchestras, ensembles, operas, and musicals. As a teen, I led congregational singing, but until 19 December 2010, I had never played trumpet in a church orchestra.

Archangel Gabriel Wall Relief, Church of San Michele, Florence, Italy, 1359 A.D.

My wife and I have heard and joined in congregational singing with this orchestra at a local community church several times this year. It is the best of its kind that I’ve ever heard in the Greater Seattle Area. The compositions and arrangements are sophisticated and even challenging at times.

One Sunday in the church bulletin, there was an offer to consider new members in the orchestra. I auditioned and was accepted as a substitute trumpeter. There are three regular trumpeters and several subs like me. The lead trumpeter has been there well over 20 years and plays at least a dozen instruments. Another regular also has been there more than 20, and the other more than 15.   

The day I played, there were about 18 musicians in the orchestra; sometimes there are as many as 25-30. The choir numbered about 50. On this occasion, we were not playing “And the Trumpet Shall Sound” from Handel’s Messiah. Instead, this was the music:

  • “Festival of Carols” (a medley of four)
  • “Angels We Have Heard on High”
  • “The First Noel,”
  • “Come, Emmanuel,”
  • “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day.”

Bass Performance Hall, Ft. Worth, TX, by Tony Gutierriz/AP, 14 June 2002

I had not known that “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” was written as a poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow after he had lost two wives and one of his sons had been severely wounded in the Civil War. He wrote the words on 25 December 1864. About four months later, the Civil War ended and peaced reigned over the land once more. Later, the poem was modified and became a carol. Its last two stanzas read as follows:

“And in despair I bowed my head;
‘There is no peace on earth,’ I said;
‘For hate is strong,
And mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!’

“Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
‘God is not dead; nor doth he sleep!
The Wrong shall fail,
The Right prevail,
With peace on earth, good-will to men!'”

Can you worship with a horn? Until last Sunday I was not sure—maybe concentrating on playing the music correctly would displace worship. No, to my pleasant surprise, it did not. It was a moving experience. You can worship with your horn just as surely as you do with your voice in song. And it’s especially poignant when you’re accompanying an excellent church choir like this one.  Volunteer and try it someday—you’ll like it.

Posted in Church Music | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Stanford Cardinals 41, UW Huskies 0, Three Bands 100!

Posted by glennled on November 11, 2010

Thrilling Pre-Game Percussion Performance--Wow! Those Drummers!

The Stanford Cardinals skunked the University of Washington Huskies, 41-0, a couple of weeks ago. It was

Crushing half-time stats!

 the Huskies’ first home shutout in 34 years (since 1976)! Our team stunk so bad that fans started leaving by half-time. No doubt, the cold rain made that an easy decision for many fans. But if you came for the bands and the music, then Husky Stadium smelled sweet as a rose, and you were entertained in high fashion. The half-time show, especially, was fantastic!

Husky Alumni Band

There were three bands at the game: UW Varsity Marching Band, UW Husky Alumni Band, and a visiting band named “Musica Grato Himi” from Himi, Japan. (As you know, I’m a proud member of the Alumni Band and stayed at the Stanford game to the bitter, cold, rainy end.)

The half-time show was spectacular! Not only was the music superb (from the movie, “Mama Mia”), but

also some 800 cheer and dance team members from 44 junior high and high schools performed on the field along with the UW Varsity Band and Musica Grato. The entire field was covered with enthusiastic, fit people in the most colorful uniforms! For more about cheer and dance squads, please see the next post on this blog.

Finale of the 2nd Annual UW Half-time Spirit Extravaganza

Some final notes about the Japanese band. Musica Grato is Italian for “give thanks to music.” In 2005, the UW

It was a sloppy game

Husky Marching Band performed in Himi, Japan, and Musica Grato performed in Seattle at both a Husky football game and at a concert with a band from the Northshore School District located in Bothell/Woodinville. Since Musica Grato was formed in 2003, it has steadily achieved magnificent results. Atop the list of their awards and honors are their performance at the Olympic Games in Beijing, China in 2008, and the Sudler Shield prize from the John Philip Sousa Foundation of America. During the 2010 trip to Seattle, they again performed a joint concert with the Northshore School District Band on Monday, 1 November, two days after the UW-Stanford football game.

The Huskies will come back

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9th Grader’s Jazz Solo–“He Nailed It!”

Posted by glennled on November 21, 2009

Today I went to the Northshore Performing Arts Center (NPAC) in Bothell to hear my 9th grade trumpet student play with his school group in the “Northshore Jazz Festival.” I sat next to his Dad at the end of the row of seats occupied by their family, including his Mom, siblings, and one set of grandparents.

There were 25 jazz ensembles and bands on the program, some traveling from far away places such as Wenatchee, Langley (on Whidbey Island), Bremerton, Arlington, Monroe, and Snoqualmie. They played from 8 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Each group played three pieces. During lunch, the jazz ensemble from Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA, played a concert. The festival was not a contest. It was a show. Each group got to show how well they’re playing at this stage of the school year, and a group of professional musicians, instructors and conductors critiqued each band. They made written notes and recorded audio comments, as feedback for the band directors and members to consider later.

I started snapping photos with my Blackberry phone camera when my student’s group appeared on stage. They sounded good and were well-rehearsed. Several key players seem to form the core of the group. My student is lead trumpeter. In the middle of the second piece, he improvised a solo! Afterwards, his Dad proudly said to me, “He nailed it!” I gave him thumbs up and a broad smile. Those lessons are paying off. Way to go, man!

Posted in Festivals & Competitions | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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